Preservation of glial cytoarchitecture from ex vivo human tumor and non-tumor cerebral cortical explants: A human model to study neurological diseases

Kaisorn L. Chaichana, Vivian Capilla-Gonzalez, Oscar Gonzalez-Perez, Gustavo Pradilla, James Han, Alessandro Olivi, Henry Brem, Jose Manuel Garcia-Verdugo, Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

For the human brain, in vitro models that accurately represent what occurs in vivo are lacking. Organotypic models may be the closest parallel to human brain tissue outside of a live patient. However, this model has been limited primarily to rodent-derived tissue. We present an organotypic model to maintain intraoperatively collected human tumor and non-tumor explants ex vivo for a prolonged period of time (∼11 days) without any significant changes to the tissue cytoarchitecture as evidenced through immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy analyses. The ability to establish and reliably predict the cytoarchitectural changes that occur with time in an organotypic model of tumor and non-tumor human brain tissue has several potential applications including the study of cell migration on actual tissue matrix, drug toxicity on neural tissue and pharmacological treatment for brain cancers, among others.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)261-270
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Neuroscience Methods
Volume164
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 30 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Neuroglia
Neoplasms
Brain
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Brain Neoplasms
Cell Movement
Rodentia
Electron Microscopy
Immunohistochemistry
Pharmacology

Keywords

  • Brain
  • Electron microscopy
  • Explant
  • Human
  • Immunohistochemistry
  • Organotypic

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Preservation of glial cytoarchitecture from ex vivo human tumor and non-tumor cerebral cortical explants : A human model to study neurological diseases. / Chaichana, Kaisorn L.; Capilla-Gonzalez, Vivian; Gonzalez-Perez, Oscar; Pradilla, Gustavo; Han, James; Olivi, Alessandro; Brem, Henry; Garcia-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo.

In: Journal of Neuroscience Methods, Vol. 164, No. 2, 30.08.2007, p. 261-270.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chaichana, Kaisorn L. ; Capilla-Gonzalez, Vivian ; Gonzalez-Perez, Oscar ; Pradilla, Gustavo ; Han, James ; Olivi, Alessandro ; Brem, Henry ; Garcia-Verdugo, Jose Manuel ; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo. / Preservation of glial cytoarchitecture from ex vivo human tumor and non-tumor cerebral cortical explants : A human model to study neurological diseases. In: Journal of Neuroscience Methods. 2007 ; Vol. 164, No. 2. pp. 261-270.
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