Pregnancy-Associated Plasma Protein-A Elevation in Patients With Acute Coronary Syndrome and Subsequent Atorvastatin Therapy

Michael D. Miedema, Cheryl A Conover, Holly MacDonald, Sean C. Harrington, Dedra Oberg, Daniel Wilson, Timothy D. Henry, Robert S. Schwartz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) was associated with atherosclerotic plaque vulnerability, whereas statin therapy was associated with increased plaque stability. Eighty-six patients presenting with clinical indications (non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction, unstable angina, and stable angina) for invasive coronary angiography and subsequent verified coronary artery disease (CAD) were randomly assigned in a double-blind manner to atorvastatin 10 or 80 mg/day. PAPP-A, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and lipids were measured at baseline (before statin therapy) and at 1 and 6 months. PAPP-A was significantly increased in 35 patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) compared with 51 patients with stable CAD (p <0.001). Patients randomly assigned to atorvastatin 10 mg did not show a significant decrease in PAPP-A from baseline at 1 or 6 months. Patients treated with atorvastatin 80 mg showed a significant decrease at 1 month compared with baseline, but not at 6 months. hs-CRP was not significantly different between the ACS and stable CAD groups. Patients receiving atorvastatin 10 mg showed no hs-CRP decrease at 1 or 6 months, whereas it significantly decreased in the 80-mg group at 6 months, but not at 1 month. In conclusion, PAPP-A significantly increased in patients with ACS compared with those with stable coronary disease. High-dose atorvastatin significantly decreased PAPP-A at 1 month and hs-CRP at 6 months in patients with verified CAD. Low-dose atorvastatin did not produce this effect.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)35-39
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Cardiology
Volume101
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2008

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Pregnancy-Associated Plasma Protein-A
Acute Coronary Syndrome
C-Reactive Protein
Coronary Artery Disease
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors
Therapeutics
Stable Angina
Atorvastatin Calcium
Unstable Angina
Atherosclerotic Plaques
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Disease
Lipids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Pregnancy-Associated Plasma Protein-A Elevation in Patients With Acute Coronary Syndrome and Subsequent Atorvastatin Therapy. / Miedema, Michael D.; Conover, Cheryl A; MacDonald, Holly; Harrington, Sean C.; Oberg, Dedra; Wilson, Daniel; Henry, Timothy D.; Schwartz, Robert S.

In: American Journal of Cardiology, Vol. 101, No. 1, 01.01.2008, p. 35-39.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Miedema, Michael D. ; Conover, Cheryl A ; MacDonald, Holly ; Harrington, Sean C. ; Oberg, Dedra ; Wilson, Daniel ; Henry, Timothy D. ; Schwartz, Robert S. / Pregnancy-Associated Plasma Protein-A Elevation in Patients With Acute Coronary Syndrome and Subsequent Atorvastatin Therapy. In: American Journal of Cardiology. 2008 ; Vol. 101, No. 1. pp. 35-39.
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