Pregnancy and Parental Leave During Graduate Medical Education

Janis E. Blair, Anita P. Mayer, Suzanne L. Caubet, Suzanne M. Norby, Mary I. O’Connor, Sharonne N. Hayes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE: To understand the pregnancy, childbirth, and parental leave plans and experiences of trainees in multiple graduate medical education (GME) programs at a single institution. METHOD: In 2013, the authors developed and deployed a voluntary, Internet-based survey of trainees in 269 residency and fellowship programs across the three sites of the Mayo School of Graduate Medical Education. The survey assessed pregnancy-related issues, including use of relevant institutional policies, changes in work due to pregnancy, and activities during pregnancy and parental leave. The authors analyzed the responses to make comparisons across groups. RESULTS: Forty-two percent (644/1,516) of trainees responded. Less than half (264; 41%) had children, and 46 (7%) were currently pregnant (themselves or their partners). Among parents, 24 (of 73; 33%) women and 28 (of 81; 35%) men planned to have another child during their current training program, and 13 (18%) women and 14 (17%) men planned to do so during their next training program. Among nonparents, 40 (of 135; 30%) women and 36 (of 111; 32%) men planned pregnancies during their current training program, and 25 (19%) women and 14 (13%) men planned pregnancies during their next training program. Of respondents eligible for parental leave, 81 (of 83; 98%) women and 89 (of 101; 88%) men had used it. CONCLUSIONS: Approximately 40% of respondents planned to have children during their GME training; most will require family leave and institutional support. GME programs should pursue policies and practices to minimize the effects of these leaves on their workforce.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAcademic Medicine
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Nov 24 2015

Fingerprint

Parental Leave
parental leave
Graduate Medical Education
pregnancy
graduate
Pregnancy
training program
Education
trainee
Family Planning Services
education
Family Leave
Organizational Policy
Internship and Residency
Internet
Parents
Parturition
parents
Surveys and Questionnaires
school

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Education

Cite this

Blair, J. E., Mayer, A. P., Caubet, S. L., Norby, S. M., O’Connor, M. I., & Hayes, S. N. (Accepted/In press). Pregnancy and Parental Leave During Graduate Medical Education. Academic Medicine. https://doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0000000000001006

Pregnancy and Parental Leave During Graduate Medical Education. / Blair, Janis E.; Mayer, Anita P.; Caubet, Suzanne L.; Norby, Suzanne M.; O’Connor, Mary I.; Hayes, Sharonne N.

In: Academic Medicine, 24.11.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Blair, JE, Mayer, AP, Caubet, SL, Norby, SM, O’Connor, MI & Hayes, SN 2015, 'Pregnancy and Parental Leave During Graduate Medical Education', Academic Medicine. https://doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0000000000001006
Blair JE, Mayer AP, Caubet SL, Norby SM, O’Connor MI, Hayes SN. Pregnancy and Parental Leave During Graduate Medical Education. Academic Medicine. 2015 Nov 24. https://doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0000000000001006
Blair, Janis E. ; Mayer, Anita P. ; Caubet, Suzanne L. ; Norby, Suzanne M. ; O’Connor, Mary I. ; Hayes, Sharonne N. / Pregnancy and Parental Leave During Graduate Medical Education. In: Academic Medicine. 2015.
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