Pre-endoscopic Rockall and Blatchford Scores to identify which emergency department patients with suspected gastrointestinal bleed do not need endoscopic hemostasis

Andrew C. Meltzer, Sarah Burnett, Carrie Pinchbeck, Angela L. Brown, Tina Choudhri, Kabir Yadav, David E. Fleischer, Jesse M. Pines

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The pre-endoscopic Rockall Score (RS) and the Glasgow-Blatchford Scores (GBS) can help risk stratify patients with upper gastrointestinal bleed who are seen in the Emergency Department (ED). The RS and GBS have yet to be validated in a United States patient population for their ability to discriminate which ED patients with upper gastrointestinal bleed do not need endoscopic hemostasis. Objective: We sought to determine whether patients who received a score of zero on either score (the lowest risk) in the ED still required upper endoscopic hemostasis during hospitalization. Methods: Retrospective electronic medical record chart review was performed during a 3-year period (2007-2009) to identify patients with suspected upper gastrointestinal bleed by ED final diagnosis of gastrointestinal hemorrhage and related terms at a single urban academic ED. The RS and GBS were calculated from ED chart abstraction and the hospital records of admitted patients were queried for subsequent endoscopic hemostasis. Results: Six hundred and ninety patients with gastrointestinal bleed were identified and 86% were admitted to the hospital. One hundred and twenty-two patients had an RS equal to zero; 67 (55%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 46-63%) of these patients were admitted to the hospital and 11 (16%; 95% CI 9-27%) received endoscopic hemostasis. Sixty-three patients had a GBS equal to zero; 15 (24%; 95% CI 15-36%) were admitted to the hospital and 2 (13%; 95% CI 4-38%) received endoscopic hemostasis. Conclusions: Some patients who were identified as lowest risk by the GBS or RS still received endoscopic hemostasis during hospital admission. These clinical decision rules may be insufficiently sensitive to predict which patients do not require endoscopic hemostasis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1083-1087
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Emergency Medicine
Volume44
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2013

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Endoscopic Hemostasis
Hospital Emergency Service
Confidence Intervals
Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage
Hospital Records
Electronic Health Records

Keywords

  • clinical decision rules
  • Emergency Department
  • endoscopy
  • gastrointestinal
  • hemorrhage

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine

Cite this

Pre-endoscopic Rockall and Blatchford Scores to identify which emergency department patients with suspected gastrointestinal bleed do not need endoscopic hemostasis. / Meltzer, Andrew C.; Burnett, Sarah; Pinchbeck, Carrie; Brown, Angela L.; Choudhri, Tina; Yadav, Kabir; Fleischer, David E.; Pines, Jesse M.

In: Journal of Emergency Medicine, Vol. 44, No. 6, 06.2013, p. 1083-1087.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Meltzer, Andrew C. ; Burnett, Sarah ; Pinchbeck, Carrie ; Brown, Angela L. ; Choudhri, Tina ; Yadav, Kabir ; Fleischer, David E. ; Pines, Jesse M. / Pre-endoscopic Rockall and Blatchford Scores to identify which emergency department patients with suspected gastrointestinal bleed do not need endoscopic hemostasis. In: Journal of Emergency Medicine. 2013 ; Vol. 44, No. 6. pp. 1083-1087.
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