Postmenopausal cancer risk after self-reported endometriosis diagnosis in the Iowa Women's Health Study

Janet E Olson, James R Cerhan, Carol A. Janney, Kristin E. Anderson, Celine M Vachon, Thomas A. Sellers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

108 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND. Endometriosis, the presence of endometrial tissue outside the uterus, has an estimated prevalence between 4% and 10%. A recent study reported that women with a hospital discharge diagnosis of endometriosis were at increased risk of cancer at any site, breast cancer, ovarian cancer, and hematopoietic malignancies, especially non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). METHODS. The authors examined whether self-reported diagnosis of endometriosis was associated with increased risk of various cancers in the Iowa Women's Health Study. Incident cancer cases were identified from 1986 through 1998. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to calculate relative risks and 95% confidence intervals for the particular cancers of interest. RESULTS. Of 37,434 participants in this analysis, 3.8% reported a history of endometriosis at baseline in 1986. After 13 years of follow-up, 1795 breast, 188 ovarian, and 243 NHL cases were detected in the cohort. Endometriosis was not associated with risk of all cancers combined (age-adjusted relative risk [RR], 0.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.7-1.2), breast carcinoma (RR, 1.0; 95% CI, 0.8-1.3), or ovarian carcinoma (RR, 0.8; 95% CI, 0.2-2.4). However, endometriosis was significantly associated with risk of NHL (age-adjusted RR, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.0-3.0), especially diffuse NHL (RR, 3.2; 95% CI, 1.8-5.6). Multivariate adjustment had minimal effect on the point estimates of risk (NHL RR, 1.7; 95% CI, 0.97-2.7; diffuse NHL RR, 3.3; 95% CI, 1.9-5.9). Endometriosis was not associated with elevated risk of lung, urinary tract, endometrial, melanoma, or colorectal carcinomas (RRs, 1.2, 0.8, 1.2, 0.7, and 0.7, respectively). CONCLUSIONS. These results corroborate a previously reported association between endometriosis and increased risk of NHL but not cancer at other sites.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1612-1618
Number of pages7
JournalCancer
Volume94
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2002

Fingerprint

Women's Health
Endometriosis
Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma
Neoplasms
Confidence Intervals
Breast Neoplasms
Hematologic Neoplasms
Endometrial Neoplasms
Urinary Tract
Proportional Hazards Models
Ovarian Neoplasms
Uterus
Colorectal Neoplasms
Melanoma
Breast

Keywords

  • Breast carcinoma
  • Cohort study
  • Endometriosis
  • Lymphoma
  • Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Postmenopausal cancer risk after self-reported endometriosis diagnosis in the Iowa Women's Health Study. / Olson, Janet E; Cerhan, James R; Janney, Carol A.; Anderson, Kristin E.; Vachon, Celine M; Sellers, Thomas A.

In: Cancer, Vol. 94, No. 5, 01.03.2002, p. 1612-1618.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Olson, Janet E ; Cerhan, James R ; Janney, Carol A. ; Anderson, Kristin E. ; Vachon, Celine M ; Sellers, Thomas A. / Postmenopausal cancer risk after self-reported endometriosis diagnosis in the Iowa Women's Health Study. In: Cancer. 2002 ; Vol. 94, No. 5. pp. 1612-1618.
@article{ae348b55b3244f71abaca9425bf264ab,
title = "Postmenopausal cancer risk after self-reported endometriosis diagnosis in the Iowa Women's Health Study",
abstract = "BACKGROUND. Endometriosis, the presence of endometrial tissue outside the uterus, has an estimated prevalence between 4{\%} and 10{\%}. A recent study reported that women with a hospital discharge diagnosis of endometriosis were at increased risk of cancer at any site, breast cancer, ovarian cancer, and hematopoietic malignancies, especially non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). METHODS. The authors examined whether self-reported diagnosis of endometriosis was associated with increased risk of various cancers in the Iowa Women's Health Study. Incident cancer cases were identified from 1986 through 1998. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to calculate relative risks and 95{\%} confidence intervals for the particular cancers of interest. RESULTS. Of 37,434 participants in this analysis, 3.8{\%} reported a history of endometriosis at baseline in 1986. After 13 years of follow-up, 1795 breast, 188 ovarian, and 243 NHL cases were detected in the cohort. Endometriosis was not associated with risk of all cancers combined (age-adjusted relative risk [RR], 0.9; 95{\%} confidence interval [CI], 0.7-1.2), breast carcinoma (RR, 1.0; 95{\%} CI, 0.8-1.3), or ovarian carcinoma (RR, 0.8; 95{\%} CI, 0.2-2.4). However, endometriosis was significantly associated with risk of NHL (age-adjusted RR, 1.8; 95{\%} CI, 1.0-3.0), especially diffuse NHL (RR, 3.2; 95{\%} CI, 1.8-5.6). Multivariate adjustment had minimal effect on the point estimates of risk (NHL RR, 1.7; 95{\%} CI, 0.97-2.7; diffuse NHL RR, 3.3; 95{\%} CI, 1.9-5.9). Endometriosis was not associated with elevated risk of lung, urinary tract, endometrial, melanoma, or colorectal carcinomas (RRs, 1.2, 0.8, 1.2, 0.7, and 0.7, respectively). CONCLUSIONS. These results corroborate a previously reported association between endometriosis and increased risk of NHL but not cancer at other sites.",
keywords = "Breast carcinoma, Cohort study, Endometriosis, Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL)",
author = "Olson, {Janet E} and Cerhan, {James R} and Janney, {Carol A.} and Anderson, {Kristin E.} and Vachon, {Celine M} and Sellers, {Thomas A.}",
year = "2002",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1002/cncr.10370",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "94",
pages = "1612--1618",
journal = "Cancer",
issn = "0008-543X",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Inc.",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Postmenopausal cancer risk after self-reported endometriosis diagnosis in the Iowa Women's Health Study

AU - Olson, Janet E

AU - Cerhan, James R

AU - Janney, Carol A.

AU - Anderson, Kristin E.

AU - Vachon, Celine M

AU - Sellers, Thomas A.

PY - 2002/3/1

Y1 - 2002/3/1

N2 - BACKGROUND. Endometriosis, the presence of endometrial tissue outside the uterus, has an estimated prevalence between 4% and 10%. A recent study reported that women with a hospital discharge diagnosis of endometriosis were at increased risk of cancer at any site, breast cancer, ovarian cancer, and hematopoietic malignancies, especially non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). METHODS. The authors examined whether self-reported diagnosis of endometriosis was associated with increased risk of various cancers in the Iowa Women's Health Study. Incident cancer cases were identified from 1986 through 1998. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to calculate relative risks and 95% confidence intervals for the particular cancers of interest. RESULTS. Of 37,434 participants in this analysis, 3.8% reported a history of endometriosis at baseline in 1986. After 13 years of follow-up, 1795 breast, 188 ovarian, and 243 NHL cases were detected in the cohort. Endometriosis was not associated with risk of all cancers combined (age-adjusted relative risk [RR], 0.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.7-1.2), breast carcinoma (RR, 1.0; 95% CI, 0.8-1.3), or ovarian carcinoma (RR, 0.8; 95% CI, 0.2-2.4). However, endometriosis was significantly associated with risk of NHL (age-adjusted RR, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.0-3.0), especially diffuse NHL (RR, 3.2; 95% CI, 1.8-5.6). Multivariate adjustment had minimal effect on the point estimates of risk (NHL RR, 1.7; 95% CI, 0.97-2.7; diffuse NHL RR, 3.3; 95% CI, 1.9-5.9). Endometriosis was not associated with elevated risk of lung, urinary tract, endometrial, melanoma, or colorectal carcinomas (RRs, 1.2, 0.8, 1.2, 0.7, and 0.7, respectively). CONCLUSIONS. These results corroborate a previously reported association between endometriosis and increased risk of NHL but not cancer at other sites.

AB - BACKGROUND. Endometriosis, the presence of endometrial tissue outside the uterus, has an estimated prevalence between 4% and 10%. A recent study reported that women with a hospital discharge diagnosis of endometriosis were at increased risk of cancer at any site, breast cancer, ovarian cancer, and hematopoietic malignancies, especially non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). METHODS. The authors examined whether self-reported diagnosis of endometriosis was associated with increased risk of various cancers in the Iowa Women's Health Study. Incident cancer cases were identified from 1986 through 1998. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to calculate relative risks and 95% confidence intervals for the particular cancers of interest. RESULTS. Of 37,434 participants in this analysis, 3.8% reported a history of endometriosis at baseline in 1986. After 13 years of follow-up, 1795 breast, 188 ovarian, and 243 NHL cases were detected in the cohort. Endometriosis was not associated with risk of all cancers combined (age-adjusted relative risk [RR], 0.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.7-1.2), breast carcinoma (RR, 1.0; 95% CI, 0.8-1.3), or ovarian carcinoma (RR, 0.8; 95% CI, 0.2-2.4). However, endometriosis was significantly associated with risk of NHL (age-adjusted RR, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.0-3.0), especially diffuse NHL (RR, 3.2; 95% CI, 1.8-5.6). Multivariate adjustment had minimal effect on the point estimates of risk (NHL RR, 1.7; 95% CI, 0.97-2.7; diffuse NHL RR, 3.3; 95% CI, 1.9-5.9). Endometriosis was not associated with elevated risk of lung, urinary tract, endometrial, melanoma, or colorectal carcinomas (RRs, 1.2, 0.8, 1.2, 0.7, and 0.7, respectively). CONCLUSIONS. These results corroborate a previously reported association between endometriosis and increased risk of NHL but not cancer at other sites.

KW - Breast carcinoma

KW - Cohort study

KW - Endometriosis

KW - Lymphoma

KW - Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL)

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0036500591&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0036500591&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/cncr.10370

DO - 10.1002/cncr.10370

M3 - Article

C2 - 11920519

AN - SCOPUS:0036500591

VL - 94

SP - 1612

EP - 1618

JO - Cancer

JF - Cancer

SN - 0008-543X

IS - 5

ER -