Persistently elevated parathyroid hormone secretion and action in young women after four weeks of ingesting high phosphorus, low calcium diets

Mona S. Calvo, Rajiv Kumar, Hunter Heath

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

146 Scopus citations

Abstract

In an earlier 8-day study, we showed increased immunoreactive PTH (iPTH) levels in young adults fed high phosphorus (P), low calcium (Ca) diets assembled from common grocery foods, a dietary pattern characteristic of teens and young adults. Because animals fed high P, low Ca diets developed secondary hyperparathyroidism and, ultimately, osteopenia, perhaps the typical teen diet may reduce peak bone mass and contribute to osteoporotic fracture later in life. To determine if the elevation in iPTH levels and action persists with chronic intake of this typical diet, we studied the 24-h mineral and hormone responses of 15 young women (18-25 yr of age) to either high P, low Ca or control diets. Each subject served as her own control, first consuming a basal diet (800 mg Ca, 900 mg P) for 28 days; 10 women were then switched to the high P, low Ca test diet (400 mg Ca, 1700 mg P) for 28 days, while the remaining 5 women in the control group continued eating the basal diet. On days 28 and 56, all subjects were studied as inpatients for 24 h, with blood drawn every 4 h and collection of fasting and 24-h urine. Serum iPTH (midregion) and serum intact PTH (2-site immunoradiometric assay) increased significantly [maximal increases of 26% (P < 0.002) and 36% (P < 0.004), respectively] after 4 weeks of consuming the test diet, and there was no change in the control group. In contrast to our 8-day study, plasma levels of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D did not change in either group. Our findings suggest that this common dietary pattern in young adult women causes persistent alterations in calcium-regulating hormones that could be unfavorable to achieving maximal positive bone balance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1334-1340
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume70
Issue number5
StatePublished - May 1990

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

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