Percutaneous chemical gallbladder sclerosis after laser-induced cystic duct obliteration: Results in an experimental model

M. J. Girard, S. Saini, P. R. Mueller, M. J. Lee, R. E. Ribeiro, J. T. Ferrucci, Thomas J Flotte

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVE. Chemical gallbladder sclerosis has been attempted as a way to defunctionalize the gallbladder in patients who have undergone nonsurgical removal of gallstones and who are unable to undergo surgical/laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The purpose of this investigation was threefold: to study an animal model for chemical sclerosis of the gallbladder with 95% ethanol and 3% sodium tetradecyl sulfate, to attempt chemical sclerosis immediately after percutaneous cystic duct obliteration by laser thermocoagulation, and to assess histopathologic changes in the gallbladder after sclerosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS. Percutaneous cholecystostomy and laser thermocoagulation of the cystic duct was performed in 13 pigs. Eight pigs underwent immediate gallbladder sclerosis with 95% ethanol and 3% sodium tetradecyl sulfate while two pigs received 95% ethanol only. The remaining three pigs served as controls. The cholecystostomy catheter was removed immediately after the procedure. All animals were sacrificed 6 weeks after laser thermocoagulation. Multiple sections through the gallbladder, which included the adjacent liver, the cystic duct, and the common bile duct, were obtained for histologic examination. RESULTS. At autopsy, the gallbladder in all 10 animals who underwent gallbladder sclerosis was reduced in size compared with controls. In all treated animals, the gallbladder mucosa was denuded; however, in nine of 10 cases reepithelialization had occurred. Complete sclerosis without reepithelialization was achieved in one pig who received both ethanol and sodium tetradecyl sulfate. In the two animals who received ethanol only, the depth of wall necrosis around the gallbladder lumen was less than in those pigs who received both ethanol and sodium tetradecyl sulfate. No pigs showed signs of hepatic necrosis or injury to the common bile duct. CONCLUSION. Cystic duct laser thermocoagulation allows immediate gallbladder sclerotherapy without injury to the common bile duct. Sclerosis with ethanol and sodium tetradecyl sulfate results in denudation of the gallbladder mucosa. However, a single therapeutic session with immediate removal of the cholecystostomy catheter was inadequate for gallbladder ablation in this model because of reepithelialization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)997-999
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Journal of Roentgenology
Volume159
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1992
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

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