Perceptions of cancer controllability and cancer risk knowledge: The moderating role of race, ethnicity, and acculturation

A. Susana Ramírez, Lila J Rutten, April Oh, Bryan Leyva Vengoechea, Richard P. Moser, Robin C. Vanderpool, Bradford W. Hesse

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Literature suggests racial/ethnic minorities, particularly those who are less-acculturated, have stronger fatalistic attitudes toward cancer than do non-Latino Whites. Knowledge of cancer prevention is also lower among racial/ethnic minorities. Moreover, low knowledge about cancer risk factors is often associated with fatalistic beliefs. Our study examined fatalism and cancer knowledge by race/ethnicity and explored whether race/ethnicity moderate the association of fatalism with knowledge of cancer prevention and risk factors. We analyzed data from the Health Information National Trends Survey (2008), a national probability survey, to calculate population estimates of the associations among race/ethnicity, fatalistic beliefs, and knowledge about cancer from multivariable logistic regression. Racial/ethnic minorities had higher odds of holding fatalistic beliefs and lower odds of having knowledge of cancer risk factors than non-Hispanic Whites, and important differences by acculturation among Latinos were observed. Limited evidence of the moderating effect of race/ethnicity on the relationship between fatalistic beliefs and cancer risk factor knowledge was observed. Knowledge of cancer risk factors is low among all race/ethnicities, while fatalistic beliefs about cancer are higher among racial/ethnic minorities compared with non-Hispanic Whites. Implications for cancer education efforts are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)254-261
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Cancer Education
Volume28
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2013

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Acculturation
Neoplasms
Hispanic Americans
Logistic Models

Keywords

  • Cancer fatalism
  • Communication inequalities
  • Disparities
  • Health communication

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Oncology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Perceptions of cancer controllability and cancer risk knowledge : The moderating role of race, ethnicity, and acculturation. / Ramírez, A. Susana; Rutten, Lila J; Oh, April; Vengoechea, Bryan Leyva; Moser, Richard P.; Vanderpool, Robin C.; Hesse, Bradford W.

In: Journal of Cancer Education, Vol. 28, No. 2, 06.2013, p. 254-261.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ramírez, A. Susana ; Rutten, Lila J ; Oh, April ; Vengoechea, Bryan Leyva ; Moser, Richard P. ; Vanderpool, Robin C. ; Hesse, Bradford W. / Perceptions of cancer controllability and cancer risk knowledge : The moderating role of race, ethnicity, and acculturation. In: Journal of Cancer Education. 2013 ; Vol. 28, No. 2. pp. 254-261.
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