Patients' perceptions of exercise therapy in the treatment of fibromyalgia syndrome: a survey.

J. G. McVeigh, A. Lucas, D. A. Hurley, J. R. Basford, G. D. Baxter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To identify patients' perceptions of the role and benefits of exercise in the treatment of fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). DESIGN: A postal questionnaire was sent to all 225 members of the Northern Ireland Fibromyalgia Support Group. The questionnaire consisted of 19 questions and was sub-divided into four sections: (1) background information; (2) previous treatment; (3) opinions on the role of exercise in FMS and (4) current participation in, and barriers to, exercise. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics. RESULTS: A response rate of 51.1% (115/225) was achieved. Forty nine percent (57) of respondents were receiving FMS-associated disability benefits and 13% (15) were working full-time. All reported previous treatment for FMS. Ninety-six (84%) had received medication and 82 (71%) exercise-based therapy. Just over half (42/82) of those who had participated in exercise therapy reported it to be an effective management strategy. Two thirds (48/71) of those who used bedrest, and over half (52/96) of those who used medications reported these interventions to be effective. Eighty-two per cent (94) 'agreed' or 'strongly agreed' that exercise improved fitness and 60% (69) 'agreed' or 'strongly agreed' that exercise increased feelings of well-being, but only 13.9% (16) reported that it reduced their pain. The most commonly reported barriers to exercise were fatigue (85%, 98) and pain (73%, 84). CONCLUSION: Exercise therapy is a common treatment for fibromyalgia syndrome, but while respondents accepted its general health benefits, the vast majority did not report that it reduced their pain.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)98-107
Number of pages10
JournalMusculoskeletal Care
Volume1
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Exercise Therapy
Fibromyalgia
Exercise
Pain
Therapeutics
Northern Ireland
Bed Rest
Self-Help Groups
Insurance Benefits
Fatigue
Surveys and Questionnaires
Emotions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Rehabilitation
  • Nursing (miscellaneous)
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Chiropractics

Cite this

McVeigh, J. G., Lucas, A., Hurley, D. A., Basford, J. R., & Baxter, G. D. (2003). Patients' perceptions of exercise therapy in the treatment of fibromyalgia syndrome: a survey. Musculoskeletal Care, 1(2), 98-107. https://doi.org/10.1002/msc.45

Patients' perceptions of exercise therapy in the treatment of fibromyalgia syndrome : a survey. / McVeigh, J. G.; Lucas, A.; Hurley, D. A.; Basford, J. R.; Baxter, G. D.

In: Musculoskeletal Care, Vol. 1, No. 2, 09.2003, p. 98-107.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McVeigh, JG, Lucas, A, Hurley, DA, Basford, JR & Baxter, GD 2003, 'Patients' perceptions of exercise therapy in the treatment of fibromyalgia syndrome: a survey.', Musculoskeletal Care, vol. 1, no. 2, pp. 98-107. https://doi.org/10.1002/msc.45
McVeigh, J. G. ; Lucas, A. ; Hurley, D. A. ; Basford, J. R. ; Baxter, G. D. / Patients' perceptions of exercise therapy in the treatment of fibromyalgia syndrome : a survey. In: Musculoskeletal Care. 2003 ; Vol. 1, No. 2. pp. 98-107.
@article{c8be746485fa4e468c824940969151bc,
title = "Patients' perceptions of exercise therapy in the treatment of fibromyalgia syndrome: a survey.",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: To identify patients' perceptions of the role and benefits of exercise in the treatment of fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). DESIGN: A postal questionnaire was sent to all 225 members of the Northern Ireland Fibromyalgia Support Group. The questionnaire consisted of 19 questions and was sub-divided into four sections: (1) background information; (2) previous treatment; (3) opinions on the role of exercise in FMS and (4) current participation in, and barriers to, exercise. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics. RESULTS: A response rate of 51.1{\%} (115/225) was achieved. Forty nine percent (57) of respondents were receiving FMS-associated disability benefits and 13{\%} (15) were working full-time. All reported previous treatment for FMS. Ninety-six (84{\%}) had received medication and 82 (71{\%}) exercise-based therapy. Just over half (42/82) of those who had participated in exercise therapy reported it to be an effective management strategy. Two thirds (48/71) of those who used bedrest, and over half (52/96) of those who used medications reported these interventions to be effective. Eighty-two per cent (94) 'agreed' or 'strongly agreed' that exercise improved fitness and 60{\%} (69) 'agreed' or 'strongly agreed' that exercise increased feelings of well-being, but only 13.9{\%} (16) reported that it reduced their pain. The most commonly reported barriers to exercise were fatigue (85{\%}, 98) and pain (73{\%}, 84). CONCLUSION: Exercise therapy is a common treatment for fibromyalgia syndrome, but while respondents accepted its general health benefits, the vast majority did not report that it reduced their pain.",
author = "McVeigh, {J. G.} and A. Lucas and Hurley, {D. A.} and Basford, {J. R.} and Baxter, {G. D.}",
year = "2003",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1002/msc.45",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "1",
pages = "98--107",
journal = "Practice Development in Health Care",
issn = "1475-9861",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Ltd",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Patients' perceptions of exercise therapy in the treatment of fibromyalgia syndrome

T2 - a survey.

AU - McVeigh, J. G.

AU - Lucas, A.

AU - Hurley, D. A.

AU - Basford, J. R.

AU - Baxter, G. D.

PY - 2003/9

Y1 - 2003/9

N2 - OBJECTIVE: To identify patients' perceptions of the role and benefits of exercise in the treatment of fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). DESIGN: A postal questionnaire was sent to all 225 members of the Northern Ireland Fibromyalgia Support Group. The questionnaire consisted of 19 questions and was sub-divided into four sections: (1) background information; (2) previous treatment; (3) opinions on the role of exercise in FMS and (4) current participation in, and barriers to, exercise. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics. RESULTS: A response rate of 51.1% (115/225) was achieved. Forty nine percent (57) of respondents were receiving FMS-associated disability benefits and 13% (15) were working full-time. All reported previous treatment for FMS. Ninety-six (84%) had received medication and 82 (71%) exercise-based therapy. Just over half (42/82) of those who had participated in exercise therapy reported it to be an effective management strategy. Two thirds (48/71) of those who used bedrest, and over half (52/96) of those who used medications reported these interventions to be effective. Eighty-two per cent (94) 'agreed' or 'strongly agreed' that exercise improved fitness and 60% (69) 'agreed' or 'strongly agreed' that exercise increased feelings of well-being, but only 13.9% (16) reported that it reduced their pain. The most commonly reported barriers to exercise were fatigue (85%, 98) and pain (73%, 84). CONCLUSION: Exercise therapy is a common treatment for fibromyalgia syndrome, but while respondents accepted its general health benefits, the vast majority did not report that it reduced their pain.

AB - OBJECTIVE: To identify patients' perceptions of the role and benefits of exercise in the treatment of fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). DESIGN: A postal questionnaire was sent to all 225 members of the Northern Ireland Fibromyalgia Support Group. The questionnaire consisted of 19 questions and was sub-divided into four sections: (1) background information; (2) previous treatment; (3) opinions on the role of exercise in FMS and (4) current participation in, and barriers to, exercise. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics. RESULTS: A response rate of 51.1% (115/225) was achieved. Forty nine percent (57) of respondents were receiving FMS-associated disability benefits and 13% (15) were working full-time. All reported previous treatment for FMS. Ninety-six (84%) had received medication and 82 (71%) exercise-based therapy. Just over half (42/82) of those who had participated in exercise therapy reported it to be an effective management strategy. Two thirds (48/71) of those who used bedrest, and over half (52/96) of those who used medications reported these interventions to be effective. Eighty-two per cent (94) 'agreed' or 'strongly agreed' that exercise improved fitness and 60% (69) 'agreed' or 'strongly agreed' that exercise increased feelings of well-being, but only 13.9% (16) reported that it reduced their pain. The most commonly reported barriers to exercise were fatigue (85%, 98) and pain (73%, 84). CONCLUSION: Exercise therapy is a common treatment for fibromyalgia syndrome, but while respondents accepted its general health benefits, the vast majority did not report that it reduced their pain.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=32744455883&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=32744455883&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/msc.45

DO - 10.1002/msc.45

M3 - Article

C2 - 20217670

AN - SCOPUS:32744455883

VL - 1

SP - 98

EP - 107

JO - Practice Development in Health Care

JF - Practice Development in Health Care

SN - 1475-9861

IS - 2

ER -