Patient-Reported Outcomes Can Be Used to Streamline Post-Total Hip Arthroplasty Follow-Up to High-Risk Patients

Jie J. Yao, Hilal D Maradit Kremers, Cathy D. Schleck, Dirk R. Larson, Jasvinder A. Singh, Daniel J. Berry, David G. Lewallen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Patient-reported outcomes are increasingly used to capture the patients' perspective in total hip arthroplasty (THA). They can potentially be used to streamline post-THA follow-up to high-risk patients. We aimed to determine whether the long-term revision risk in THA relates to patient-reported measures at 2 and 5 years. Methods: In a single-institution cohort of primary THA procedures, we examined the association between 2-year and 5-year pain and Mayo Hip Scores and the risk of revision. Results: The absolute scores at 2 and 5 years were both significantly associated with the risk of revisions. Every 10-unit decline in the 2-year Mayo Hip Score <60 was associated with a significant 50% increase in the risk of revision (hazard ratio, 1.5 per 10 units; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-1.8). Similarly, every 10-unit decline in the 5-year Mayo Hip Score <60 was associated with almost doubling of the risk of revision (hazard ratio, 1.9 per 10 units; 95% confidence interval, 1.7-2.1). Conclusion: We conclude that patient-reported outcomes in THA have prognostic importance and can be taken into account when planning frequency of aftercare. This will improve the efficiency of follow-up in large registry-based follow-up efforts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Arthroplasty
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2017

Fingerprint

Arthroplasty
Hip
Confidence Intervals
Aftercare
Patient Reported Outcome Measures
Registries
Pain

Keywords

  • Follow-up
  • Patient-reported outcomes
  • Revision risk
  • Risk factors
  • Total hip arthroplasty

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Patient-Reported Outcomes Can Be Used to Streamline Post-Total Hip Arthroplasty Follow-Up to High-Risk Patients. / Yao, Jie J.; Maradit Kremers, Hilal D; Schleck, Cathy D.; Larson, Dirk R.; Singh, Jasvinder A.; Berry, Daniel J.; Lewallen, David G.

In: Journal of Arthroplasty, 2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yao, Jie J. ; Maradit Kremers, Hilal D ; Schleck, Cathy D. ; Larson, Dirk R. ; Singh, Jasvinder A. ; Berry, Daniel J. ; Lewallen, David G. / Patient-Reported Outcomes Can Be Used to Streamline Post-Total Hip Arthroplasty Follow-Up to High-Risk Patients. In: Journal of Arthroplasty. 2017.
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AU - Yao, Jie J.

AU - Maradit Kremers, Hilal D

AU - Schleck, Cathy D.

AU - Larson, Dirk R.

AU - Singh, Jasvinder A.

AU - Berry, Daniel J.

AU - Lewallen, David G.

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