Patient Motivation and Long-Term Satisfaction with Treatment Choice in Vestibular Schwannoma

Matthew L. Carlson, Øystein Vesterli Tveiten, Morten Lund-Johansen, Nicole M. Tombers, Christine M. Lohse, Michael J. Link

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To ascertain primary motivation and long-term satisfaction with treatment selection in patients with vestibular schwannoma. Methods: A multicenter, cross-sectional survey was performed. Patients with small- to medium-sized sporadic vestibular schwannoma who underwent stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS; n = 247), microsurgery (n = 144), or observation (n = 148) between 1998 and 2008 were surveyed regarding their motivation behind treatment selection and hindsight satisfaction with their choice of management. Results: “Physician recommendation” was the most commonly stated reason for modality selection in all 3 groups. The second and third most common reasons for selecting SRS included “less invasive option than surgery” in 80 patients (32%) and “less recovery time than surgery” in 16 patients (6%). The second and third most common reasons for selecting observation included “to avoid side-effects of treatment” in 25 patients (17%) and “symptoms not severe enough to warrant intervention” in 22 patients (15%). The second and third most common reasons for selecting microsurgery included “do not want tumor in head” in 35 patients (24%) and “most definitive treatment” in 15 patients (10%). Overall, 232 patients (96%) treated with SRS, 141 observed patients (97%), and 121 patients (85%) who underwent microsurgical treatment were satisfied with their original decision (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Motivation behind treatment selection varies between individuals. Those who select observation and SRS commonly reference less invasiveness and lower risk, whereas those who select microsurgery are commonly motivated by having their tumor physically removed and the more definitive nature of treatment. Posttreatment satisfaction is highest in patients who undergo SRS and observation, although all 3 groups report high levels of satisfaction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalWorld Neurosurgery
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

Acoustic Neuroma
Motivation
Microsurgery
Observation
Therapeutics
Radiosurgery
Patient Selection
Neoplasms
Cross-Sectional Studies
Head
Physicians

Keywords

  • Acoustic neuroma
  • Quality of life
  • Vestibular schwannoma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Carlson, M. L., Tveiten, Ø. V., Lund-Johansen, M., Tombers, N. M., Lohse, C. M., & Link, M. J. (Accepted/In press). Patient Motivation and Long-Term Satisfaction with Treatment Choice in Vestibular Schwannoma. World Neurosurgery. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.wneu.2018.03.182

Patient Motivation and Long-Term Satisfaction with Treatment Choice in Vestibular Schwannoma. / Carlson, Matthew L.; Tveiten, Øystein Vesterli; Lund-Johansen, Morten; Tombers, Nicole M.; Lohse, Christine M.; Link, Michael J.

In: World Neurosurgery, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Carlson, Matthew L. ; Tveiten, Øystein Vesterli ; Lund-Johansen, Morten ; Tombers, Nicole M. ; Lohse, Christine M. ; Link, Michael J. / Patient Motivation and Long-Term Satisfaction with Treatment Choice in Vestibular Schwannoma. In: World Neurosurgery. 2018.
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abstract = "Objectives: To ascertain primary motivation and long-term satisfaction with treatment selection in patients with vestibular schwannoma. Methods: A multicenter, cross-sectional survey was performed. Patients with small- to medium-sized sporadic vestibular schwannoma who underwent stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS; n = 247), microsurgery (n = 144), or observation (n = 148) between 1998 and 2008 were surveyed regarding their motivation behind treatment selection and hindsight satisfaction with their choice of management. Results: “Physician recommendation” was the most commonly stated reason for modality selection in all 3 groups. The second and third most common reasons for selecting SRS included “less invasive option than surgery” in 80 patients (32{\%}) and “less recovery time than surgery” in 16 patients (6{\%}). The second and third most common reasons for selecting observation included “to avoid side-effects of treatment” in 25 patients (17{\%}) and “symptoms not severe enough to warrant intervention” in 22 patients (15{\%}). The second and third most common reasons for selecting microsurgery included “do not want tumor in head” in 35 patients (24{\%}) and “most definitive treatment” in 15 patients (10{\%}). Overall, 232 patients (96{\%}) treated with SRS, 141 observed patients (97{\%}), and 121 patients (85{\%}) who underwent microsurgical treatment were satisfied with their original decision (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Motivation behind treatment selection varies between individuals. Those who select observation and SRS commonly reference less invasiveness and lower risk, whereas those who select microsurgery are commonly motivated by having their tumor physically removed and the more definitive nature of treatment. Posttreatment satisfaction is highest in patients who undergo SRS and observation, although all 3 groups report high levels of satisfaction.",
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AB - Objectives: To ascertain primary motivation and long-term satisfaction with treatment selection in patients with vestibular schwannoma. Methods: A multicenter, cross-sectional survey was performed. Patients with small- to medium-sized sporadic vestibular schwannoma who underwent stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS; n = 247), microsurgery (n = 144), or observation (n = 148) between 1998 and 2008 were surveyed regarding their motivation behind treatment selection and hindsight satisfaction with their choice of management. Results: “Physician recommendation” was the most commonly stated reason for modality selection in all 3 groups. The second and third most common reasons for selecting SRS included “less invasive option than surgery” in 80 patients (32%) and “less recovery time than surgery” in 16 patients (6%). The second and third most common reasons for selecting observation included “to avoid side-effects of treatment” in 25 patients (17%) and “symptoms not severe enough to warrant intervention” in 22 patients (15%). The second and third most common reasons for selecting microsurgery included “do not want tumor in head” in 35 patients (24%) and “most definitive treatment” in 15 patients (10%). Overall, 232 patients (96%) treated with SRS, 141 observed patients (97%), and 121 patients (85%) who underwent microsurgical treatment were satisfied with their original decision (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Motivation behind treatment selection varies between individuals. Those who select observation and SRS commonly reference less invasiveness and lower risk, whereas those who select microsurgery are commonly motivated by having their tumor physically removed and the more definitive nature of treatment. Posttreatment satisfaction is highest in patients who undergo SRS and observation, although all 3 groups report high levels of satisfaction.

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