Outcomes and Complications of Pregnancy in Women with Primary Hyperoxaluria

Suzanne M. Norby, Dawn S. Milliner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Information about pregnancy in females with primary hyperoxaluria types I and II (PH-I, PH-II) is limited to isolated case reports. This study sought to determine the number and outcomes of pregnancies in a series of women with PH-I and PH-II, to assess the incidence of complications during pregnancy, and to characterize infant outcomes. Methods: From a database of patients with PH followed at the Mayo Clinic, we identified 16 females who had been pregnant. A retrospective medical record review and telephone survey were performed. Results: Forty pregnancies occurring between 1961 and 1998 were identified: 26 pregnancies in 11 patients with PH-I and 14 pregnancies in 5 patients with PH-II. Thirty (75%) of the pregnancies were carried to term, and 33 infants were born. Four miscarriages, 4 preterm births, and 2 elective abortions occurred. No maternal complications were reported in half of the pregnancies. In the remaining pregnancies, the most common complications were hypertension, urinary tract infection, and urolithiasis-associated symptoms. One PH-I patient developed pre-eclampsia resulting in a stillborn infant, and another PH-1 patient developed hyperemesis gravidarum with a decline in renal function. Approximately 75% of the infants had no perinatal problems. All of the PH-I patients eventually required initiation of renal replacement therapy at a mean of 17.5 years following their first pregnancy. No PH-II patients have required renal replacement therapy. Conclusion: Overall, pregnancy appeared to be well tolerated in this series of women with primary hyperoxaluria, with I of 16 women experiencing loss of renal function during 1 of 40 pregnancies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)277-285
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Kidney Diseases
Volume43
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2004

Fingerprint

Primary Hyperoxaluria
Pregnancy Complications
Pregnancy Outcome
Pregnancy
Renal Replacement Therapy
Hyperemesis Gravidarum
Kidney
Urolithiasis
Premature Birth
Spontaneous Abortion
Pre-Eclampsia
Telephone
Urinary Tract Infections
Medical Records

Keywords

  • Hyperoxaluria
  • Kidney disease
  • Pregnancy
  • Urolithiasis
  • Women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nephrology

Cite this

Outcomes and Complications of Pregnancy in Women with Primary Hyperoxaluria. / Norby, Suzanne M.; Milliner, Dawn S.

In: American Journal of Kidney Diseases, Vol. 43, No. 2, 02.2004, p. 277-285.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Norby, Suzanne M. ; Milliner, Dawn S. / Outcomes and Complications of Pregnancy in Women with Primary Hyperoxaluria. In: American Journal of Kidney Diseases. 2004 ; Vol. 43, No. 2. pp. 277-285.
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