Outcome for hospitalized patients with fever and neutropenia who are infected with the human immunodeficiency virus

J. Hambleton, T. Aragon, G. Modin, Donald W Northfelt, M. A. Sande

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We conducted a retrospective cohort study to evaluate the occurrence of bacteremia and associated mortality among hospitalized patients who were seropositive for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and who developed fever and neutropenia following antineoplastic chemotherapy or for other reasons. Review of medical records revealed 224 episodes in 142 patients. Of these episodes, 57% occurred following antineoplastic chemotherapy, and 43% occurred under other circumstances. Members of the chemotherapy group had significantly less-advanced HIV disease, a lower mean absolute-neutrophil- count nadir, and a shorter duration of hospitalization. There was no difference between the two groups in the frequency of bacteremia or mortality due to all causes when they were compared by multivariate analysis, Statistically significant univariate and multivariate predictors of bacteremia included sepsis syndrome and concurrent infection. Predictors of mortality included sepsis syndrome, concurrent infection, bacteremia, and antimicrobial therapy. This study suggests that the cause of neutropenia in HIV-seropositive patients is not a predictor of the outcome of fever and neutropenic episodes. Instead, clinical presentation and concomitant illnesses have a greater impact on outcome for a patient.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)363-371
Number of pages9
JournalClinical Infectious Diseases
Volume20
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

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Bacteremia
Neutropenia
Fever
HIV
Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome
Drug Therapy
Antineoplastic Agents
Mortality
Virus Diseases
Infection
Medical Records
Hospitalization
Neutrophils
Cohort Studies
Multivariate Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

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Outcome for hospitalized patients with fever and neutropenia who are infected with the human immunodeficiency virus. / Hambleton, J.; Aragon, T.; Modin, G.; Northfelt, Donald W; Sande, M. A.

In: Clinical Infectious Diseases, Vol. 20, No. 2, 1995, p. 363-371.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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