No association or linkage between polymorphisms in the genes encoding cholecystokinin and the cholecystokinin B receptor and panic disorder

S. P. Hamilton, Susan L Slager, L. Helleby, G. A. Heiman, D. F. Klein, S. E. Hodge, M. M. Weissman, A. J. Fyer, J. A. Knowles

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

41 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Growing animal data implicate cholecystokinin in the regulation of anxiety, while human clinical research confirms the role of cholecystokinin in the provocation of panic attacks. Anti-panic medications suppress the ability of cholecystokinin to induce panic attacks, and may alter the expression of the cholecystokinin gene. Thus, there is increased interest in understanding the molecular genetic component of these observations. Recent association studies using persons with panic disorder described some association between polymorphisms in the genes encoding cholecystokinin and the cholecystokinin B-receptor and panic disorder. In this study, we used a family-based design, employing 596 individuals in 70 panic disorder pedigrees, as well as 77 haplotype relative risk 'triads'. Subjects were genotyped for two polymorphisms: the polymorphic microsatellite marker in the CCK-BR locus using PCR-based genotyping and at a single nucleotide polymorphism in the CCK promoter using a fluorescence polarization detection assay, and the data were analyzed for genetic association and linkage. Employing a variety of diagnostic and genetic models, linkage analysis produced no significant lod scores at either locus. Family-based tests of association, the haplotype-based haplotype relative risk statistic and the transmission disequilibrium test, were likewise non-significant. The results reported here provide little support for the role of these polymorphisms in panic disorder.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)59-65
Number of pages7
JournalMolecular Psychiatry
Volume6
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cholecystokinin B Receptor
Panic Disorder
Cholecystokinin
Haplotypes
Genes
Genetic Linkage
Lod Score
Panic
Fluorescence Polarization
Aptitude
Genetic Models
Pedigree
Microsatellite Repeats
Single Nucleotide Polymorphism
Molecular Biology
Anxiety
Gene Expression
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Research

Keywords

  • Candidate gene
  • Family-based
  • Fluorescence polarization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

No association or linkage between polymorphisms in the genes encoding cholecystokinin and the cholecystokinin B receptor and panic disorder. / Hamilton, S. P.; Slager, Susan L; Helleby, L.; Heiman, G. A.; Klein, D. F.; Hodge, S. E.; Weissman, M. M.; Fyer, A. J.; Knowles, J. A.

In: Molecular Psychiatry, Vol. 6, No. 1, 2001, p. 59-65.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hamilton, S. P. ; Slager, Susan L ; Helleby, L. ; Heiman, G. A. ; Klein, D. F. ; Hodge, S. E. ; Weissman, M. M. ; Fyer, A. J. ; Knowles, J. A. / No association or linkage between polymorphisms in the genes encoding cholecystokinin and the cholecystokinin B receptor and panic disorder. In: Molecular Psychiatry. 2001 ; Vol. 6, No. 1. pp. 59-65.
@article{c560fe3ae9ab437c88c7530748d7951f,
title = "No association or linkage between polymorphisms in the genes encoding cholecystokinin and the cholecystokinin B receptor and panic disorder",
abstract = "Growing animal data implicate cholecystokinin in the regulation of anxiety, while human clinical research confirms the role of cholecystokinin in the provocation of panic attacks. Anti-panic medications suppress the ability of cholecystokinin to induce panic attacks, and may alter the expression of the cholecystokinin gene. Thus, there is increased interest in understanding the molecular genetic component of these observations. Recent association studies using persons with panic disorder described some association between polymorphisms in the genes encoding cholecystokinin and the cholecystokinin B-receptor and panic disorder. In this study, we used a family-based design, employing 596 individuals in 70 panic disorder pedigrees, as well as 77 haplotype relative risk 'triads'. Subjects were genotyped for two polymorphisms: the polymorphic microsatellite marker in the CCK-BR locus using PCR-based genotyping and at a single nucleotide polymorphism in the CCK promoter using a fluorescence polarization detection assay, and the data were analyzed for genetic association and linkage. Employing a variety of diagnostic and genetic models, linkage analysis produced no significant lod scores at either locus. Family-based tests of association, the haplotype-based haplotype relative risk statistic and the transmission disequilibrium test, were likewise non-significant. The results reported here provide little support for the role of these polymorphisms in panic disorder.",
keywords = "Candidate gene, Family-based, Fluorescence polarization",
author = "Hamilton, {S. P.} and Slager, {Susan L} and L. Helleby and Heiman, {G. A.} and Klein, {D. F.} and Hodge, {S. E.} and Weissman, {M. M.} and Fyer, {A. J.} and Knowles, {J. A.}",
year = "2001",
doi = "10.1038/sj.mp.4000788",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "6",
pages = "59--65",
journal = "Molecular Psychiatry",
issn = "1359-4184",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - No association or linkage between polymorphisms in the genes encoding cholecystokinin and the cholecystokinin B receptor and panic disorder

AU - Hamilton, S. P.

AU - Slager, Susan L

AU - Helleby, L.

AU - Heiman, G. A.

AU - Klein, D. F.

AU - Hodge, S. E.

AU - Weissman, M. M.

AU - Fyer, A. J.

AU - Knowles, J. A.

PY - 2001

Y1 - 2001

N2 - Growing animal data implicate cholecystokinin in the regulation of anxiety, while human clinical research confirms the role of cholecystokinin in the provocation of panic attacks. Anti-panic medications suppress the ability of cholecystokinin to induce panic attacks, and may alter the expression of the cholecystokinin gene. Thus, there is increased interest in understanding the molecular genetic component of these observations. Recent association studies using persons with panic disorder described some association between polymorphisms in the genes encoding cholecystokinin and the cholecystokinin B-receptor and panic disorder. In this study, we used a family-based design, employing 596 individuals in 70 panic disorder pedigrees, as well as 77 haplotype relative risk 'triads'. Subjects were genotyped for two polymorphisms: the polymorphic microsatellite marker in the CCK-BR locus using PCR-based genotyping and at a single nucleotide polymorphism in the CCK promoter using a fluorescence polarization detection assay, and the data were analyzed for genetic association and linkage. Employing a variety of diagnostic and genetic models, linkage analysis produced no significant lod scores at either locus. Family-based tests of association, the haplotype-based haplotype relative risk statistic and the transmission disequilibrium test, were likewise non-significant. The results reported here provide little support for the role of these polymorphisms in panic disorder.

AB - Growing animal data implicate cholecystokinin in the regulation of anxiety, while human clinical research confirms the role of cholecystokinin in the provocation of panic attacks. Anti-panic medications suppress the ability of cholecystokinin to induce panic attacks, and may alter the expression of the cholecystokinin gene. Thus, there is increased interest in understanding the molecular genetic component of these observations. Recent association studies using persons with panic disorder described some association between polymorphisms in the genes encoding cholecystokinin and the cholecystokinin B-receptor and panic disorder. In this study, we used a family-based design, employing 596 individuals in 70 panic disorder pedigrees, as well as 77 haplotype relative risk 'triads'. Subjects were genotyped for two polymorphisms: the polymorphic microsatellite marker in the CCK-BR locus using PCR-based genotyping and at a single nucleotide polymorphism in the CCK promoter using a fluorescence polarization detection assay, and the data were analyzed for genetic association and linkage. Employing a variety of diagnostic and genetic models, linkage analysis produced no significant lod scores at either locus. Family-based tests of association, the haplotype-based haplotype relative risk statistic and the transmission disequilibrium test, were likewise non-significant. The results reported here provide little support for the role of these polymorphisms in panic disorder.

KW - Candidate gene

KW - Family-based

KW - Fluorescence polarization

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0035138497&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0035138497&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1038/sj.mp.4000788

DO - 10.1038/sj.mp.4000788

M3 - Article

C2 - 11244486

AN - SCOPUS:0035138497

VL - 6

SP - 59

EP - 65

JO - Molecular Psychiatry

JF - Molecular Psychiatry

SN - 1359-4184

IS - 1

ER -