Neurostimulation for Treatment of Migraine and Cluster Headache

Todd J Schwedt, Bert Vargas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The objective of this narrative review is to summarize the current state of neurostimulation therapies for the treatment of migraine and/or cluster. Methods: For this narrative review, publications were identified by searching PubMed using the search terms "migraine" or "cluster" combined with "vagal nerve stimulation," "transcranial magnetic stimulation," "supraorbital nerve stimulation," "sphenopalatine ganglion stimulation," "occipital nerve stimulation," "deep brain stimulation," "neurostimulation," or "neuromodulation." Publications were chosen based on the quality of data that were provided and their relevance to the chosen topics of interest for this review. Reference lists of chosen articles and the authors' own files were used to identify additional publications. Current clinical trials were identified by searching clinicaltrials.org. Results and Conclusions: Neurostimulation of the vagal nerve, supraorbital nerve, occipital nerve and sphenopalatine ganglion, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), and deep brain stimulation have been investigated for the treatment of migraine and/or cluster. Whereas invasive methods of neurostimulation would be reserved for patients with very severe and treatment refractory migraine or cluster, noninvasive methods of stimulation might serve as useful adjuncts to more conventional therapies. Currently, transcutaneous supraorbital nerve stimulation is FDA approved and commercially available for migraine prevention and TMS is FDA approved for the treatment of migraine with aura. The potential utility of each type of neurostimulation has yet to be completely defined.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1827-1834
Number of pages8
JournalPain Medicine (United States)
Volume16
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2015

Fingerprint

Cluster Headache
Migraine Disorders
Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation
Deep Brain Stimulation
Ganglia
Publications
Therapeutics
Vagus Nerve Stimulation
Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation
Migraine with Aura
PubMed
Clinical Trials

Keywords

  • Cluster Headache
  • Deep Brain Stimulation
  • Migraine
  • Neurostimulation
  • Occipital Nerve Stimulation
  • Sphenopalatine Ganglion Stimulation
  • Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation
  • Transcutaneous Supraorbital Nerve Stimulation
  • Vagal Nerve Stimulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

Neurostimulation for Treatment of Migraine and Cluster Headache. / Schwedt, Todd J; Vargas, Bert.

In: Pain Medicine (United States), Vol. 16, No. 9, 01.09.2015, p. 1827-1834.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{754595c7013045b2a415655dbce7242f,
title = "Neurostimulation for Treatment of Migraine and Cluster Headache",
abstract = "Objective: The objective of this narrative review is to summarize the current state of neurostimulation therapies for the treatment of migraine and/or cluster. Methods: For this narrative review, publications were identified by searching PubMed using the search terms {"}migraine{"} or {"}cluster{"} combined with {"}vagal nerve stimulation,{"} {"}transcranial magnetic stimulation,{"} {"}supraorbital nerve stimulation,{"} {"}sphenopalatine ganglion stimulation,{"} {"}occipital nerve stimulation,{"} {"}deep brain stimulation,{"} {"}neurostimulation,{"} or {"}neuromodulation.{"} Publications were chosen based on the quality of data that were provided and their relevance to the chosen topics of interest for this review. Reference lists of chosen articles and the authors' own files were used to identify additional publications. Current clinical trials were identified by searching clinicaltrials.org. Results and Conclusions: Neurostimulation of the vagal nerve, supraorbital nerve, occipital nerve and sphenopalatine ganglion, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), and deep brain stimulation have been investigated for the treatment of migraine and/or cluster. Whereas invasive methods of neurostimulation would be reserved for patients with very severe and treatment refractory migraine or cluster, noninvasive methods of stimulation might serve as useful adjuncts to more conventional therapies. Currently, transcutaneous supraorbital nerve stimulation is FDA approved and commercially available for migraine prevention and TMS is FDA approved for the treatment of migraine with aura. The potential utility of each type of neurostimulation has yet to be completely defined.",
keywords = "Cluster Headache, Deep Brain Stimulation, Migraine, Neurostimulation, Occipital Nerve Stimulation, Sphenopalatine Ganglion Stimulation, Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation, Transcutaneous Supraorbital Nerve Stimulation, Vagal Nerve Stimulation",
author = "Schwedt, {Todd J} and Bert Vargas",
year = "2015",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/pme.12792",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "16",
pages = "1827--1834",
journal = "Pain Medicine",
issn = "1526-2375",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "9",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Neurostimulation for Treatment of Migraine and Cluster Headache

AU - Schwedt, Todd J

AU - Vargas, Bert

PY - 2015/9/1

Y1 - 2015/9/1

N2 - Objective: The objective of this narrative review is to summarize the current state of neurostimulation therapies for the treatment of migraine and/or cluster. Methods: For this narrative review, publications were identified by searching PubMed using the search terms "migraine" or "cluster" combined with "vagal nerve stimulation," "transcranial magnetic stimulation," "supraorbital nerve stimulation," "sphenopalatine ganglion stimulation," "occipital nerve stimulation," "deep brain stimulation," "neurostimulation," or "neuromodulation." Publications were chosen based on the quality of data that were provided and their relevance to the chosen topics of interest for this review. Reference lists of chosen articles and the authors' own files were used to identify additional publications. Current clinical trials were identified by searching clinicaltrials.org. Results and Conclusions: Neurostimulation of the vagal nerve, supraorbital nerve, occipital nerve and sphenopalatine ganglion, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), and deep brain stimulation have been investigated for the treatment of migraine and/or cluster. Whereas invasive methods of neurostimulation would be reserved for patients with very severe and treatment refractory migraine or cluster, noninvasive methods of stimulation might serve as useful adjuncts to more conventional therapies. Currently, transcutaneous supraorbital nerve stimulation is FDA approved and commercially available for migraine prevention and TMS is FDA approved for the treatment of migraine with aura. The potential utility of each type of neurostimulation has yet to be completely defined.

AB - Objective: The objective of this narrative review is to summarize the current state of neurostimulation therapies for the treatment of migraine and/or cluster. Methods: For this narrative review, publications were identified by searching PubMed using the search terms "migraine" or "cluster" combined with "vagal nerve stimulation," "transcranial magnetic stimulation," "supraorbital nerve stimulation," "sphenopalatine ganglion stimulation," "occipital nerve stimulation," "deep brain stimulation," "neurostimulation," or "neuromodulation." Publications were chosen based on the quality of data that were provided and their relevance to the chosen topics of interest for this review. Reference lists of chosen articles and the authors' own files were used to identify additional publications. Current clinical trials were identified by searching clinicaltrials.org. Results and Conclusions: Neurostimulation of the vagal nerve, supraorbital nerve, occipital nerve and sphenopalatine ganglion, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), and deep brain stimulation have been investigated for the treatment of migraine and/or cluster. Whereas invasive methods of neurostimulation would be reserved for patients with very severe and treatment refractory migraine or cluster, noninvasive methods of stimulation might serve as useful adjuncts to more conventional therapies. Currently, transcutaneous supraorbital nerve stimulation is FDA approved and commercially available for migraine prevention and TMS is FDA approved for the treatment of migraine with aura. The potential utility of each type of neurostimulation has yet to be completely defined.

KW - Cluster Headache

KW - Deep Brain Stimulation

KW - Migraine

KW - Neurostimulation

KW - Occipital Nerve Stimulation

KW - Sphenopalatine Ganglion Stimulation

KW - Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

KW - Transcutaneous Supraorbital Nerve Stimulation

KW - Vagal Nerve Stimulation

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84941636425&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84941636425&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/pme.12792

DO - 10.1111/pme.12792

M3 - Article

C2 - 26177612

AN - SCOPUS:84941636425

VL - 16

SP - 1827

EP - 1834

JO - Pain Medicine

JF - Pain Medicine

SN - 1526-2375

IS - 9

ER -