Neuropeptide Y phase advances the in vitro hamster circadian clock during the subjective day with no effect on phase during the subjective night

Mary E. Harrington, Kathryn M. Schak

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

The mammalian daily (circadian) clock is located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the hypothalamus. Clock function can be detected by the measurement of the circadian change in spontaneous firing rate of suprachiasmatic nuclei cells in a brain slice preparation in vitro. We investigated the effects of neuropeptide Y on this rhythm of firing rate in hamster suprachiasmatic nuclei neurons. Slices were prepared using standard techniques. On the 1st day in vitro, neuropeptide Y (200 ng/200 nL; 47 pmol) was applied as a microdrop to the suprachiasmatic nuclei region at various times. Spontaneous single-unit firing was measured for 6-12 h on the 2nd day in vitro. Peak firing rate in treated slices was compared with that of untreated control slices to measure phase shifts induced by the peptide. Neuropeptide Y induced phase advances of circa-3h when applied during the subjective day (ZT 2-10) but did not significantly alter phase when applied during the subjective night. The phase shifts to neuropeptide Y in the hamster tissue in vitro are similar in phase dependency and magnitude to shifts measured in vivo.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)87-92
Number of pages6
JournalCanadian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology
Volume78
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000

Keywords

  • Circadian
  • Neuropeptide Y
  • Rhythm
  • Suprachiasmatic

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Pharmacology
  • Physiology (medical)

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