Natural history of nasal vestibulitis associated with paclitaxel, docetaxel, and other chemotherapy agents: a Minnesota Cancer Clinical Trials Network (MNCCTN) study

Elizabeth J. Cathcart-Rake, David Zahrieh, Deanne Smith, Susan Young, Shaylene McCue, Amanda O’Connor, Stephan Thomé, Mario Lacouture, Terra Register, Jill Piens, Bret B. Friday, Charles L. Loprinzi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: To describe the natural history of nasal vestibulitis in patients receiving taxane chemotherapy, including incidence, severity, and associated symptoms. Methods: Eligible patients with minimal or no baseline nasal symptoms were enrolled in this natural history study at initiation of a new chemotherapy regimen. Patients completed nasal symptom logs each time they received a chemotherapy dose. This manuscript reports upon the patients who received paclitaxel, docetaxel, or non-taxane non-bevacizumab chemotherapy. The proportions of patients within each cohort reporting any treatment-emergent nasal symptoms were estimated, with corresponding exact 95% confidence intervals. A cumulative incidence function was estimated within the chemotherapy cohorts to calculate the cumulative incidence rate of treatment-emergent nasal vestibulitis, treating death and disease progression as competing risks. Results: Of the 81 evaluable patients, nasal symptoms were reported by 76.5% (58.8%, 89.3%) receiving paclitaxel, 54.2% (32.8%, 74.5%) receiving docetaxel, and 47.8% (26.8%, 69.4%) receiving non-taxane and non-bevacizumab chemotherapy. Of the three pairwise chemotherapy group comparisons, both the tests comparing the cumulative incidence function between the paclitaxel and non-taxane non-bevacizumab chemotherapy cohorts and between the paclitaxel and docetaxel cohorts achieved statistical significance at the 5% level with a higher incidence of treatment-emergent nasal vestibulitis in the paclitaxel cohort in both comparisons (P = 0.026 and P = 0.035, respectively). These significant differences were retained in the cumulative incidence function regression analysis controlling for age, smoking history, allergies, and asthma. Most patients in the paclitaxel cohort reported nasal symptoms as moderate or severe (56%). Conclusion: Patients receiving paclitaxel chemotherapy experience a high incidence of nasal symptoms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalSupportive Care in Cancer
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • Chemotherapy side effects
  • Nasal vestibulitis
  • Paclitaxel
  • Symptom management

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology

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