NASA-TLX assessment of workload in resident physicians and faculty surgeons covering trauma, surgical intensive care unit, and emergency general surgery services

Sarah Lund, Maria Yan, Jonathan D'Angelo, Tianke Wang, M. Susan Hallbeck, Stephanie Heller, Martin D Zielinski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Higher workload is associated with burnout and lower performance. Therefore, we aim to assess shift-related factors associated with higher workload on EGS, ICU, and trauma surgery services. Methods: In this prospective cohort study, faculty surgeons and surgery residents completed a survey after each EGS, ICU, or trauma shift, including shift details and a modified NASA-TLX. Results: Seventeen faculty and 12 residents completed 174 and 48 surveys after working scheduled 12-h and 24-h shifts, respectively (response rates: faculty – 62%, residents – 42%). NASA-TLX was significantly increased with a higher physician subjective fatigue level. Further, seeing more consults or performing more operations than average significantly increased workload. Finally, NASA-TLX was significantly higher for faculty when they felt their shift was more difficult than expected. Conclusions: Higher volume clinical responsibilities and higher subjective fatigue levels are independently associated with higher workload. Designing shift coverage to expand on busier days may decrease workload, impacting burnout and shift performance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican journal of surgery
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • Emergency general surgery
  • NASA-Task load index
  • Surgical intensive care unit
  • Trauma surgery
  • Workload

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'NASA-TLX assessment of workload in resident physicians and faculty surgeons covering trauma, surgical intensive care unit, and emergency general surgery services'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this