Morbidity of nonfebrile status epilepticus in Rochester, Minnesota, 1965-1984

Gregory D Cascino, Dale Hesdorffer, Giancarlo Logroscino, W. Allen Hauser

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Purpose: To analyze the nonfatal adverse events (AE) associated with a first episode of status epilepticus (SE). Methods: We performed a population-based retrospective cohort study to determine the morbidity of SE. Participants included 184 residents of Rochester, Minnesota who experienced nonfebrile SE between 1965 and 1984. Results: The etiology of SE was acute symptomatic in 100 patients and unprovoked in 84 patients. The most common seizure-types were continuous partial (n = 56, 30%), generalized convulsive (n = 52, 28%), and generalized with focal features (n = 32, 17%). Morbidity related to SE was noted in 5 of the 146 patients (3.4%) surviving 30 days. The AE included hemiparesis (n = 3), encephalopathy (n = 2), mental retardation (n = 1), and aphasia (n = 1). All patients with morbidity had an acute symptomatic (n = 4) or remote symptomatic (n = 1) etiology. Thirty-four patients (18.5%) had a second episode of SE. Conclusions: Based on this retrospective study, significant morbidity related to SE is uncommon and is associated with the underlying etiology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)829-832
Number of pages4
JournalEpilepsia
Volume39
Issue number8
StatePublished - 1998

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Status Epilepticus
Morbidity
Retrospective Studies
Aphasia
Brain Diseases
Paresis
Intellectual Disability
Seizures
Cohort Studies
Population

Keywords

  • Acute symptomatic
  • Morbidity
  • Status epilepticusunprovoked

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Cascino, G. D., Hesdorffer, D., Logroscino, G., & Hauser, W. A. (1998). Morbidity of nonfebrile status epilepticus in Rochester, Minnesota, 1965-1984. Epilepsia, 39(8), 829-832.

Morbidity of nonfebrile status epilepticus in Rochester, Minnesota, 1965-1984. / Cascino, Gregory D; Hesdorffer, Dale; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Hauser, W. Allen.

In: Epilepsia, Vol. 39, No. 8, 1998, p. 829-832.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cascino, GD, Hesdorffer, D, Logroscino, G & Hauser, WA 1998, 'Morbidity of nonfebrile status epilepticus in Rochester, Minnesota, 1965-1984', Epilepsia, vol. 39, no. 8, pp. 829-832.
Cascino GD, Hesdorffer D, Logroscino G, Hauser WA. Morbidity of nonfebrile status epilepticus in Rochester, Minnesota, 1965-1984. Epilepsia. 1998;39(8):829-832.
Cascino, Gregory D ; Hesdorffer, Dale ; Logroscino, Giancarlo ; Hauser, W. Allen. / Morbidity of nonfebrile status epilepticus in Rochester, Minnesota, 1965-1984. In: Epilepsia. 1998 ; Vol. 39, No. 8. pp. 829-832.
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