Minimally invasive subtotal colectomy and ileal pouch-anal anastomosis for fulminant ulcerative colitis: A reasonable approach?

Stefan D. Holubar, David Larson, Eric Dozois, Jirawat Pattana-arun, John H. Pemberton, Robert R. Cima

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE: This study was designed to evaluate the safety, feasibility, and short-term outcomes of three-stage minimally invasive surgery for fulminant ulcerative colitis. METHODS: Using a prospective database, we identified all patients with ulcerative colitis who underwent minimally invasive surgery for both subtotal colectomy and subsequent ileal pouch-anal anastomosis at our institution from 2000 to 2007. Demographics and short-term outcomes were retrospectively evaluated. RESULTS: During seven years, 50 patients underwent minimally invasive subtotal colectomy for fulminant ulcerative colitis*50 percent were male, with a median age of 34 years. All patients had refractory colitis: 96 percent were taking steroids, 76 percent were recently hospitalized, 59 percent had Q5 kg weight loss, 57 percent had anemia that required transfusions, 30 percent were on biologic-based therapy, and 96 percent had Q1 severe Truelove & Witts' criteria. Of these 50 procedures, 72 percent were performed by using laparoscopic-assisted and 28 percent with hand-assisted techniques. The conversion rate was 6 percent. Subsequently, minimally invasive completion proctectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis was performed in 42 patients with a 2.3 percent conversion rate. Median length of stay after each procedure was four days. There was one anastomotic leak and no mortality. CONCLUSIONS: A staged, minimally invasive approach for patients with fulminant ulcerative colitis is technically feasible, safe, and reasonable operative strategy, which yields short postoperative length of stay.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)187-192
Number of pages6
JournalDiseases of the Colon and Rectum
Volume52
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2009

Fingerprint

Colonic Pouches
Colectomy
Ulcerative Colitis
Minimally Invasive Surgical Procedures
Length of Stay
Anastomotic Leak
Biological Therapy
Colitis
Anemia
Weight Loss
Hand
Steroids
Demography
Databases
Safety
Mortality

Keywords

  • Fulminant
  • Ileal pouch-anal anastomosis
  • Laparoscopic
  • Ulcerative colitis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Minimally invasive subtotal colectomy and ileal pouch-anal anastomosis for fulminant ulcerative colitis : A reasonable approach? / Holubar, Stefan D.; Larson, David; Dozois, Eric; Pattana-arun, Jirawat; Pemberton, John H.; Cima, Robert R.

In: Diseases of the Colon and Rectum, Vol. 52, No. 2, 02.2009, p. 187-192.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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