Measurement of Energy Expenditure in Man

A Review of Available Methods

James A. Levine, Marsha Morgan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Measurement of energy expenditure in man is required to assess metabolic needs and fuel utilization. Indirect and direct calorimetric and non-calorimetric methods for measuring energy expenditure are reviewed and their relative value for measurement in the clinical setting assessed. Where high accuracy is required and sufficient resources are available, chamber-based indirect and direct calorimeters are optimal. If less accurate measurements are acceptable, or resources are limited, flexible total collection systems or canopy ventilated, flow-over, indirect calorimetry systems provide assessments of acceptable accuracy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)325-343
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Nutritional Medicine
Volume1
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1990
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

energy expenditure
Energy Metabolism
Indirect Calorimetry
calorimeters
calorimetry
methodology
canopy

Keywords

  • direct calorimetry
  • energy balance
  • energy expenditure
  • indirect calorimetry
  • metabolism
  • resting metabolic rate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Measurement of Energy Expenditure in Man : A Review of Available Methods. / Levine, James A.; Morgan, Marsha.

In: Journal of Nutritional Medicine, Vol. 1, No. 4, 01.01.1990, p. 325-343.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Levine, James A. ; Morgan, Marsha. / Measurement of Energy Expenditure in Man : A Review of Available Methods. In: Journal of Nutritional Medicine. 1990 ; Vol. 1, No. 4. pp. 325-343.
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