Mastery learning for health professionals using technology-enhanced simulation

A systematic review and meta-analysis

David Allan Cook, Ryan Brydges, Benjamin Zendejas, Stanley J. Hamstra, Rose Hatala

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

113 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Competency-based education requires individualization of instruction. Mastery learning, an instructional approach requiring learners to achieve a defined proficiency before proceeding to the next instructional objective, offers one approach to individualization. The authors sought to summarize the quantitative outcomes of mastery learning simulation-based medical education (SBME) in comparison with no intervention and nonmastery instruction, and to determine what features of mastery SBME make it effective. Method: The authors searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, ERIC, PsycINFO, Scopus, key journals, and previous review bibliographies through May 2011. They included original research in any language evaluating mastery SBME, in comparison with any intervention or no intervention, for practicing and student physicians, nurses, and other health professionals. Working in duplicate, they abstracted information on trainees, instructional design (interactivity, feedback, repetitions, and learning time), study design, and outcomes. Results: They identified 82 studies evaluating mastery SBME. In comparison with no intervention, mastery SBME was associated with large effects on skills (41 studies; effect size [ES] 1.29 [95% confidence interval, 1.08-1.50]) and moderate effects on patient outcomes (11 studies; ES 0.73 [95% CI, 0.36-1.10]). In comparison with nonmastery SBME instruction, mastery learning was associated with large benefit in skills (3 studies; effect size 1.17 [95% CI, 0.29-2.05]) but required more time. Pretraining and additional practice improved outcomes but, again, took longer. Studies exploring enhanced feedback and self-regulated learning in the mastery model showed mixed results. Conclusions: Limited evidence suggests that mastery learning SBME is superior to nonmastery instruction but takes more time.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1178-1186
Number of pages9
JournalAcademic Medicine
Volume88
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2013

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Medical Education
health professionals
Meta-Analysis
Learning
Technology
simulation
Health
learning
education
instruction
individualization
Competency-Based Education
Time and Motion Studies
Bibliography
MEDLINE
interactive media
trainee
bibliography
Language
Nurses

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Education

Cite this

Mastery learning for health professionals using technology-enhanced simulation : A systematic review and meta-analysis. / Cook, David Allan; Brydges, Ryan; Zendejas, Benjamin; Hamstra, Stanley J.; Hatala, Rose.

In: Academic Medicine, Vol. 88, No. 8, 08.2013, p. 1178-1186.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cook, David Allan ; Brydges, Ryan ; Zendejas, Benjamin ; Hamstra, Stanley J. ; Hatala, Rose. / Mastery learning for health professionals using technology-enhanced simulation : A systematic review and meta-analysis. In: Academic Medicine. 2013 ; Vol. 88, No. 8. pp. 1178-1186.
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