Mast cells are a major source of basic fibroblast growth factor in chronic inflammation and cutaneous hemangioma

Z. Qu, J. M. Liebler, M. R. Powers, T. Galey, P. Ahmadi, X. N. Huang, J. C. Ansel, J. H. Butterfield, S. R. Planck, J. T. Rosenbaum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

283 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Mast cells play an essential role during development of inflammation after chemical and immunological insults and have been implicated in tissue fibrosis and angiogenesis. The exact contribution of mast cells to these conditions is largely unknown. In this study, we found that a potent angiogenic and mitogenic polypeptide, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), is localized to the majority of mast cells from normal skin and lung and in tissue samples characterized by fibrosis, hyperplasia, and neovascularization. Using specific antibodies to mast cell tryptase, tissue macrophage, and bFGF, we demonstrate that cytoplasmic bFGF immunoreactivity is localized to 96.8 ± 9.6 of tryptase-positive cells in human fibrotic lung tissue (n = 10), 82.3 ± 6.9% of tryptase-positive cells in rheumatoid synovia (N = 6), and 93.1 ± 4.8% of tryptase-positive cells in skin hemangioma (n = 5). Moreover, these tryptase-positive cells comprise a major portion (86 to 97%) of nonvascular cell exhibiting cytoplasmic-like cells contribute less than 10% of the bFGF-positive cells in the same samples. The specificity of the immunostaining results was supported by the finding that cultured human mast cells (HMC-1) express both bFGF mRNA and proteins. OUr data indicate that mast cells, a primary source of heparin, also serve as a significant source of heparin, also serve as a significant source of heparin- binding growth, bFGF, in these disease processes. Theses observations suggest that mast cells may contribute to these pathological conditions by releasing this polypeptide.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)564-573
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Journal of Pathology
Volume147
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Fibroblast Growth Factor 2
Hemangioma
Mast Cells
Tryptases
Inflammation
Skin
Heparin
Fibrosis
Lung
Peptides
Synovial Fluid
Hyperplasia
Macrophages
Messenger RNA
Antibodies
Growth
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

Qu, Z., Liebler, J. M., Powers, M. R., Galey, T., Ahmadi, P., Huang, X. N., ... Rosenbaum, J. T. (1995). Mast cells are a major source of basic fibroblast growth factor in chronic inflammation and cutaneous hemangioma. American Journal of Pathology, 147(3), 564-573.

Mast cells are a major source of basic fibroblast growth factor in chronic inflammation and cutaneous hemangioma. / Qu, Z.; Liebler, J. M.; Powers, M. R.; Galey, T.; Ahmadi, P.; Huang, X. N.; Ansel, J. C.; Butterfield, J. H.; Planck, S. R.; Rosenbaum, J. T.

In: American Journal of Pathology, Vol. 147, No. 3, 1995, p. 564-573.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Qu, Z, Liebler, JM, Powers, MR, Galey, T, Ahmadi, P, Huang, XN, Ansel, JC, Butterfield, JH, Planck, SR & Rosenbaum, JT 1995, 'Mast cells are a major source of basic fibroblast growth factor in chronic inflammation and cutaneous hemangioma', American Journal of Pathology, vol. 147, no. 3, pp. 564-573.
Qu, Z. ; Liebler, J. M. ; Powers, M. R. ; Galey, T. ; Ahmadi, P. ; Huang, X. N. ; Ansel, J. C. ; Butterfield, J. H. ; Planck, S. R. ; Rosenbaum, J. T. / Mast cells are a major source of basic fibroblast growth factor in chronic inflammation and cutaneous hemangioma. In: American Journal of Pathology. 1995 ; Vol. 147, No. 3. pp. 564-573.
@article{b124efad521c4f79acb80f125126dab9,
title = "Mast cells are a major source of basic fibroblast growth factor in chronic inflammation and cutaneous hemangioma",
abstract = "Mast cells play an essential role during development of inflammation after chemical and immunological insults and have been implicated in tissue fibrosis and angiogenesis. The exact contribution of mast cells to these conditions is largely unknown. In this study, we found that a potent angiogenic and mitogenic polypeptide, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), is localized to the majority of mast cells from normal skin and lung and in tissue samples characterized by fibrosis, hyperplasia, and neovascularization. Using specific antibodies to mast cell tryptase, tissue macrophage, and bFGF, we demonstrate that cytoplasmic bFGF immunoreactivity is localized to 96.8 ± 9.6 of tryptase-positive cells in human fibrotic lung tissue (n = 10), 82.3 ± 6.9{\%} of tryptase-positive cells in rheumatoid synovia (N = 6), and 93.1 ± 4.8{\%} of tryptase-positive cells in skin hemangioma (n = 5). Moreover, these tryptase-positive cells comprise a major portion (86 to 97{\%}) of nonvascular cell exhibiting cytoplasmic-like cells contribute less than 10{\%} of the bFGF-positive cells in the same samples. The specificity of the immunostaining results was supported by the finding that cultured human mast cells (HMC-1) express both bFGF mRNA and proteins. OUr data indicate that mast cells, a primary source of heparin, also serve as a significant source of heparin, also serve as a significant source of heparin- binding growth, bFGF, in these disease processes. Theses observations suggest that mast cells may contribute to these pathological conditions by releasing this polypeptide.",
author = "Z. Qu and Liebler, {J. M.} and Powers, {M. R.} and T. Galey and P. Ahmadi and Huang, {X. N.} and Ansel, {J. C.} and Butterfield, {J. H.} and Planck, {S. R.} and Rosenbaum, {J. T.}",
year = "1995",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "147",
pages = "564--573",
journal = "American Journal of Pathology",
issn = "0002-9440",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Mast cells are a major source of basic fibroblast growth factor in chronic inflammation and cutaneous hemangioma

AU - Qu, Z.

AU - Liebler, J. M.

AU - Powers, M. R.

AU - Galey, T.

AU - Ahmadi, P.

AU - Huang, X. N.

AU - Ansel, J. C.

AU - Butterfield, J. H.

AU - Planck, S. R.

AU - Rosenbaum, J. T.

PY - 1995

Y1 - 1995

N2 - Mast cells play an essential role during development of inflammation after chemical and immunological insults and have been implicated in tissue fibrosis and angiogenesis. The exact contribution of mast cells to these conditions is largely unknown. In this study, we found that a potent angiogenic and mitogenic polypeptide, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), is localized to the majority of mast cells from normal skin and lung and in tissue samples characterized by fibrosis, hyperplasia, and neovascularization. Using specific antibodies to mast cell tryptase, tissue macrophage, and bFGF, we demonstrate that cytoplasmic bFGF immunoreactivity is localized to 96.8 ± 9.6 of tryptase-positive cells in human fibrotic lung tissue (n = 10), 82.3 ± 6.9% of tryptase-positive cells in rheumatoid synovia (N = 6), and 93.1 ± 4.8% of tryptase-positive cells in skin hemangioma (n = 5). Moreover, these tryptase-positive cells comprise a major portion (86 to 97%) of nonvascular cell exhibiting cytoplasmic-like cells contribute less than 10% of the bFGF-positive cells in the same samples. The specificity of the immunostaining results was supported by the finding that cultured human mast cells (HMC-1) express both bFGF mRNA and proteins. OUr data indicate that mast cells, a primary source of heparin, also serve as a significant source of heparin, also serve as a significant source of heparin- binding growth, bFGF, in these disease processes. Theses observations suggest that mast cells may contribute to these pathological conditions by releasing this polypeptide.

AB - Mast cells play an essential role during development of inflammation after chemical and immunological insults and have been implicated in tissue fibrosis and angiogenesis. The exact contribution of mast cells to these conditions is largely unknown. In this study, we found that a potent angiogenic and mitogenic polypeptide, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), is localized to the majority of mast cells from normal skin and lung and in tissue samples characterized by fibrosis, hyperplasia, and neovascularization. Using specific antibodies to mast cell tryptase, tissue macrophage, and bFGF, we demonstrate that cytoplasmic bFGF immunoreactivity is localized to 96.8 ± 9.6 of tryptase-positive cells in human fibrotic lung tissue (n = 10), 82.3 ± 6.9% of tryptase-positive cells in rheumatoid synovia (N = 6), and 93.1 ± 4.8% of tryptase-positive cells in skin hemangioma (n = 5). Moreover, these tryptase-positive cells comprise a major portion (86 to 97%) of nonvascular cell exhibiting cytoplasmic-like cells contribute less than 10% of the bFGF-positive cells in the same samples. The specificity of the immunostaining results was supported by the finding that cultured human mast cells (HMC-1) express both bFGF mRNA and proteins. OUr data indicate that mast cells, a primary source of heparin, also serve as a significant source of heparin, also serve as a significant source of heparin- binding growth, bFGF, in these disease processes. Theses observations suggest that mast cells may contribute to these pathological conditions by releasing this polypeptide.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0029117071&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0029117071&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 7545872

AN - SCOPUS:0029117071

VL - 147

SP - 564

EP - 573

JO - American Journal of Pathology

JF - American Journal of Pathology

SN - 0002-9440

IS - 3

ER -