Manipulating the host response to autologous tumour vaccines.

J. Ma, C. H. Poehlein, S. M. Jensen, M. G. LaCelle, T. M. Moudgil, D. Rüttinger, D. Haley, M. J. Goldstein, J. W. Smith, B. Curti, Helen J Ross, E. Walker, H. M. Hu, W. J. Urba, B. A. Fox

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

From our way of thinking the problem facing vaccine strategies for cancer is not that we do not have "enough" tumour antigens. The problem is we cannot induce an immune response that is sufficient to mediate tumour regression. The normal "checks and balances" found in the body prevent the sustained expansion and subsequent persistence of immune killer cells. If vaccine strategies are going to become effective treatments for cancer patients, they will need to overcome this substantial roadblock. Recent developments in immunology have provided insights into the mechanisms that regulate the expansion and persistence of T cells. This has allowed investigators to reinterpret decades-old observations suggesting that chemotherapy administered before vaccination often led to a stronger immune response. This manuscript will review experiments that offer an explanation for these observations and present pre-clinical data from our laboratory that describes an innovative new approach to combining chemotherapy and vaccination. This approach is readily translatable to the clinic and is broadly applicable to any vaccine strategy for advanced cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalDevelopments in Biologicals
Volume116
StatePublished - 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cancer Vaccines
Chemotherapy
Vaccines
Tumors
Immunology
T-cells
Vaccination
Neoplasm Antigens
Drug Therapy
Neoplasms
Antigens
Allergy and Immunology
Research Personnel
T-Lymphocytes
Experiments
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Drug Discovery
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Ma, J., Poehlein, C. H., Jensen, S. M., LaCelle, M. G., Moudgil, T. M., Rüttinger, D., ... Fox, B. A. (2004). Manipulating the host response to autologous tumour vaccines. Developments in Biologicals, 116.

Manipulating the host response to autologous tumour vaccines. / Ma, J.; Poehlein, C. H.; Jensen, S. M.; LaCelle, M. G.; Moudgil, T. M.; Rüttinger, D.; Haley, D.; Goldstein, M. J.; Smith, J. W.; Curti, B.; Ross, Helen J; Walker, E.; Hu, H. M.; Urba, W. J.; Fox, B. A.

In: Developments in Biologicals, Vol. 116, 2004.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ma, J, Poehlein, CH, Jensen, SM, LaCelle, MG, Moudgil, TM, Rüttinger, D, Haley, D, Goldstein, MJ, Smith, JW, Curti, B, Ross, HJ, Walker, E, Hu, HM, Urba, WJ & Fox, BA 2004, 'Manipulating the host response to autologous tumour vaccines.', Developments in Biologicals, vol. 116.
Ma J, Poehlein CH, Jensen SM, LaCelle MG, Moudgil TM, Rüttinger D et al. Manipulating the host response to autologous tumour vaccines. Developments in Biologicals. 2004;116.
Ma, J. ; Poehlein, C. H. ; Jensen, S. M. ; LaCelle, M. G. ; Moudgil, T. M. ; Rüttinger, D. ; Haley, D. ; Goldstein, M. J. ; Smith, J. W. ; Curti, B. ; Ross, Helen J ; Walker, E. ; Hu, H. M. ; Urba, W. J. ; Fox, B. A. / Manipulating the host response to autologous tumour vaccines. In: Developments in Biologicals. 2004 ; Vol. 116.
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