Longitudinal study of intraneural perineuriomaa benign, focal hypertrophic neuropathy of youth

Michelle L. Mauermann, Kimberly K. Amrami, Nancy L. Kuntz, Robert J. Spinner, Peter J. Dyck, E. Peter Bosch, Janean Engelstad, Joel P. Felmlee, P. James B. Dyck

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Abstract

The natural history of intraneural perineurioma has been inadequately studied. The aim of this study was to characterize the clinical presentation, electrophysiologic and imaging features and outcome of intraneural perineurioma. We ask if intraneural perineurioma is a pure motor syndrome that remains confined to one nerve and should be treated by surgical resection. We examined the nerve biopsies of cases labelled perineurioma and selected those with diagnostic features. Thirty-two patients were identified; 16 children and 16 adults; 16 males and 16 females. Median age of onset of neurological symptoms was 14 years (range 0.555 years) and median age at evaluation was 17 years (range 256 years). All patients had motor deficits; however, mild sensory symptoms or signs were experienced by 27 patients; 'prickling' or 'asleep numbness' in 20, mild pain in 13 and sensory loss in 23. The sciatic nerve or its branches was most commonly affected in 15, followed by brachial plexus, radial nerve and ulnar nerve (four each). Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated nerve enlargement (29/32), T1 isointensity (27/32), T2 hyperintensity (25/32) and contrast enhancement (20/20). Diagnoses were made based on targeted biopsy of the focal nerve enlargement identified by imaging. Neurological impairment was of a moderate severity (median Neuropathy Impairment Score was 12 points, range 249 points). All patients had focal involvement with 27 involving one nerve and five involving a plexus (one bilateral). Long-term follow-up was possible by telephone interview for 23 patients (median 36 months, range 2177 months). Twelve patients also had follow-up neurologic evaluation (median 45 months, range 10247 months). The median Neuropathy Impairment Score had changed from 12.6 to 15.4 points (P 0.19). In all cases, the distribution of neurologic findings remained unchanged. Median Dyck Disability Score was 3 (range 25) indicating a mild impairment without interfering with activities of daily living. Ten patients judged their symptoms unchanged, nine slightly worse and four slightly better. We conclude intraneural perineurioma is a benign hypertrophic (non onion bulb) peripheral nerve tumour that presents insidiously in young people and is motor predominant with mild sensory involvement. It is most often a mononeuropathy, but a plexopathy can occur. Diagnosis of this condition requires clinical suspicion, imaging, targeted fascicular biopsy of the lesion and expertise of nerve pathologists. As these tumours are static or slowly progressive, remain confined to their original distribution and have low morbidity, they probably should not be resected routinely. Because intensive evaluation is needed for diagnosis, intraneural perineurioma is probably under-recognized.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2265-2276
Number of pages12
JournalBrain
Volume132
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2009

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Keywords

  • Localized hypertrophic neuropathy
  • Nerve sheath neoplasm
  • Perineurioma
  • Peripheral neuropathy
  • Sciatic neuropathy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Mauermann, M. L., Amrami, K. K., Kuntz, N. L., Spinner, R. J., Dyck, P. J., Bosch, E. P., Engelstad, J., Felmlee, J. P., & Dyck, P. J. B. (2009). Longitudinal study of intraneural perineuriomaa benign, focal hypertrophic neuropathy of youth. Brain, 132(8), 2265-2276. https://doi.org/10.1093/brain/awp169