Longitudinal, region-specific course of diffusion tensor imaging measures in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease

Milap A. Nowrangi, Constantine G. Lyketsos, Jeannie Marie S Leoutsakos, Kenichi Oishi, Marilyn Albert, Susumu Mori, Michelle M Mielke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

59 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is a promising method for identifying significant cross-sectional differences of white-matter tracts in normal controls (NC) and those with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or Alzheimer's disease (AD). There have not been many studies establishing its longitudinal utility. Methods: Seventy-five participants (25 NC, 25 amnestic MCI, and 25 AD) had 3-Tesla MRI scans and clinical evaluations at baseline and 3, 6, and 12 months. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) were analyzed at each time-point and longitudinally in eight a priori-selected areas taken from four regions of interest (ROIs). Results: Cross-sectionally, MD values were higher, and FA values lower in the fornix and splenium of the AD group compared with either MCI or NC (P <.01). Within-group change was more evident in MD than in FA over 12 months: MD increased in the inferior, anterior cingulum, and fornix in both the MCI and AD groups (P <.01). Conclusions: There were stable, cross-sectional, region-specific differences between the NC and AD groups in both FA and MD at each time-point over 12 months. Longitudinally, MD was a better indicator of change than FA. Significant increases of fornix MD in the MCI group suggest this is an early indicator of progression.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)519-528
Number of pages10
JournalAlzheimer's and Dementia
Volume9
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2013

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Diffusion Tensor Imaging
Anisotropy
Alzheimer Disease
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Cognitive Dysfunction

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Anisotropy
  • Diffusivity
  • DTI
  • Longitudinal

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Epidemiology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Longitudinal, region-specific course of diffusion tensor imaging measures in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease. / Nowrangi, Milap A.; Lyketsos, Constantine G.; Leoutsakos, Jeannie Marie S; Oishi, Kenichi; Albert, Marilyn; Mori, Susumu; Mielke, Michelle M.

In: Alzheimer's and Dementia, Vol. 9, No. 5, 09.2013, p. 519-528.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nowrangi, Milap A. ; Lyketsos, Constantine G. ; Leoutsakos, Jeannie Marie S ; Oishi, Kenichi ; Albert, Marilyn ; Mori, Susumu ; Mielke, Michelle M. / Longitudinal, region-specific course of diffusion tensor imaging measures in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease. In: Alzheimer's and Dementia. 2013 ; Vol. 9, No. 5. pp. 519-528.
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