Long-term natural history of incidentally discovered cavernous malformations in a single-center cohort: Clinical article

S. Arthur Moore, Robert D Jr. Brown, Teresa J H Christianson, Kelly Flemming

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Object. The aim of this study was to determine the prospective hemorrhage rate in a group of retrospectively identified patients in whom symptoms had an unclear relationship to an intracerebral cavernous malformation (ICM) or the malformation itself was an incidental finding. Methods. Patients with incidentally discovered ICMs diagnosed between 1989 and 1999 were identified from a previously published cohort. Those with ICMs having an unclear relationship with existing symptoms were also eligible for analysis. Updated clinical and radiographic data pertaining to symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage related to the ICM or new seizures were obtained through medical chart review and mail survey. In select patients, phone calls were made and death certificates were obtained when possible. The prospective hemorrhage rate was calculated as the number of prospective hemorrhages divided by the number of patient-years of follow-up. Results. There were 1311 patient-years of follow-up among the 107 patients (49.5% male; mean age at diagnosis 52 years) eligible for this study. Forty-four patients died in the follow-up period, and the cause of death could be determined in 34 (77%). Two patients had a prospective hemorrhage, which was definitively related to the ICM in only one. Thus, the definitive prospective bleed rate was 0.08% per patient-year. No new seizures developed in any of the patients during the follow-up period. Conclusions. The risk of prospective hemorrhage in patients presenting asymptomatically with ICM is very low. This information can be useful in managing such patients and may be most applicable to those with a single ICM.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1188-1192
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Neurosurgery
Volume120
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

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Natural History
Hemorrhage
Seizures
Death Certificates
Incidental Findings
Cerebral Hemorrhage
Postal Service
Cause of Death

Keywords

  • Asymptomatic
  • Cavernous angioma
  • Cavernous malformation
  • Incidental
  • Natural history
  • Vascular disorders

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Surgery

Cite this

Long-term natural history of incidentally discovered cavernous malformations in a single-center cohort : Clinical article. / Moore, S. Arthur; Brown, Robert D Jr.; Christianson, Teresa J H; Flemming, Kelly.

In: Journal of Neurosurgery, Vol. 120, No. 5, 2014, p. 1188-1192.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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