Leisure-Time Physical Activity and the Risk of Incident Dementia: The Mayo Clinic Study of Aging

Janina Krell-Roesch, Nathanael T. Feder, Rosebud O Roberts, Michelle M Mielke, Teresa J. Christianson, David S Knopman, Ronald Carl Petersen, Yonas Endale Geda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We conducted a prospective cohort study derived from the population-based Mayo Clinic Study of Aging. We investigated if leisure-time physical activity among individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) was associated with a decreased risk of developing dementia. 280 persons aged≥70 years (median 81 years, 165 males) with MCI and available data from neurologic evaluation, neuropsychological testing, and questionnaire-based physical activity assessment, were followed for a median of 3 years to the outcomes of incident dementia or censoring variables. We conducted Cox proportional hazards regression analyses with age as a time scale and adjusted for sex, education, medical comorbidity, depression, and APOE ɛ4 status. Moderate intensity midlife physical activity among MCI participants was significantly associated with a decreased risk of incident dementia (HR = 0.64; 95% CI, 0.41-0.98). There was a non-significant trend for a decreased risk of dementia for light and vigorous intensity midlife physical activity, as well as light and moderate intensity late-life physical activity. In conclusion, we observed that physical activity may be associated with a reduced risk of dementia among individuals with MCI. Furthermore, intensity and timing of physical activity may be important factors when investigating this association.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)149-155
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Alzheimer's disease : JAD
Volume63
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

Leisure Activities
Dementia
Light
Sex Education
Nervous System
Comorbidity
Cohort Studies
Regression Analysis
Prospective Studies
Depression
Cognitive Dysfunction
Population

Keywords

  • APOE ɛ4
  • cohort study
  • incident dementia
  • mild cognitive impairment
  • physical activity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Leisure-Time Physical Activity and the Risk of Incident Dementia : The Mayo Clinic Study of Aging. / Krell-Roesch, Janina; Feder, Nathanael T.; Roberts, Rosebud O; Mielke, Michelle M; Christianson, Teresa J.; Knopman, David S; Petersen, Ronald Carl; Geda, Yonas Endale.

In: Journal of Alzheimer's disease : JAD, Vol. 63, No. 1, 01.01.2018, p. 149-155.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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