Isomorphism between pulsed-wave doppler ultrasound and direction-of-arrival estimation - part ii: experimental results

Mahmoud E. Allam, Randall R. Kinnick, James F. Greenleaf

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

In Part 1 of this work [1], we presented the basic principles for applying high-resolution wide-band direction-ofarrival estimation techniques to pulsed-wave Doppler ultrasound. Such techniques provide high-resolution velocity profiles and enable the identification of multiple velocity components inside a sample volume. Another important application is the identification and rejection of wall clutter signals. A first and essential step in applying these techniques is to convert the wide-band echoes to narrow band. The 2-D DFT projection method is used for this conversion. Two different narrow-band high-resolution methods are then applied to estimate the velocity distributions; the minimum variance (MV) and the multiple signal classification (MUSIC). Experimental results are presented to illustrate the potentials and limitations of applying wide-band DOA methods to different applications in pulsed-wave Doppier ultrasound.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)923-935
Number of pages13
JournalIEEE Transactions on Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics, and Frequency Control
Volume43
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 1996

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Instrumentation
  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

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