Is nitric oxide the only endothelium-derived relaxing factor in canine femoral veins?

Virginia M Miller, P. M. Vanhoutte

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

Nitric oxide may be an endothelium-derived relaxing factor in systemic arteries and pulmonary veins. The endothelium-derived relaxing factor of systemic veins has not been characterized. Experiments were designed to determine whether the endothelium-derived relaxing factor of systemic veins shared chemical properties and mechanisms of action with nitric oxide. Rings of the canine femoral vein with and without endothelium were suspended in organ chambers for the measurement of isometric force. In rings without endothelium, relaxations to nitric oxide were augmented by superoxide dismutase plus catalase and were inhibited by hemoglobin, methylene blue, and LY 83583. The endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine and A23187 were not augmented by superoxide dismutase plus catalase but were inhibited by hemoglobin and only moderately reduced by either methylene blue or LY 83583. Relaxations to sodium nitroprusside were not inhibited by methylene blue and LY 83583. Relaxations to sodium nitroprusside were inhibited by ouabain and K+-free solution; those to nitric oxide were not. These results indicate that although the endothelium-derived relaxing factor released from canine systemic veins shares some chemical properties with nitric oxide, the mechanism by which relaxations are induced by the two differ. A factor dissimilar to nitric oxide but acting like sodium nitroprusside may be released by the endothelium of canine systemic veins.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology
Volume257
Issue number6
StatePublished - 1989

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Keywords

  • acetylcholine
  • calcium ionophore
  • guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate
  • nitrovasodilators
  • systemic veins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology

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