Incorporation of pharmacogenomics into routine clinical practice: The clinical pharmacogenetics implementation consortium (CPIC) guideline development process

Kelly E. Caudle, Teri E. Klein, James M. Hoffman, Daniel J. Müller, Michelle Whirl-Carrillo, Li Gong, Ellen M. McDonagh, Katrin Sangkuhl, Caroline F. Thorn, Matthias Schwab, José A G Agúndez, Robert Freimuth, Vojtech Huser, Ming Ta Michael Lee, Otito F. Iwuchukwu, Kristine R. Crews, Stuart A. Scott, Mia Wadelius, Jesse J. Swen, Rachel F. TyndaleC. Michael Stein, Dan Roden, Mary V. Relling, Marc S. Williams, Samuel G. Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

165 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC) publishes genotype-based drug guidelines to help clinicians understand how available genetic test results could be used to optimize drug therapy. CPIC has focused initially on well-known examples of pharmacogenomic associations that have been implemented in selected clinical settings, publishing nine to date. Each CPIC guideline adheres to a standardized format and includes a standard system for grading levels of evidence linking genotypes to phenotypes and assigning a level of strength to each prescribing recommendation. CPIC guidelines contain the necessary information to help clinicians translate patient-specific diplotypes for each gene into clinical phenotypes or drug dosing groups. This paper reviews the development process of the CPIC guidelines and compares this process to the Institute of Medicine's Standards for Developing Trustworthy Clinical Practice Guidelines.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)209-217
Number of pages9
JournalCurrent Drug Metabolism
Volume15
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Pharmacogenetics
Guidelines
Genotype
Phenotype
Drug therapy
National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine (U.S.) Health and Medicine Division
Practice Guidelines
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Medicine
Genes
Drug Therapy

Keywords

  • Clinical practice guideline
  • Guideline
  • Pharmacogenetics
  • Pharmacogenomics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Clinical Biochemistry

Cite this

Incorporation of pharmacogenomics into routine clinical practice : The clinical pharmacogenetics implementation consortium (CPIC) guideline development process. / Caudle, Kelly E.; Klein, Teri E.; Hoffman, James M.; Müller, Daniel J.; Whirl-Carrillo, Michelle; Gong, Li; McDonagh, Ellen M.; Sangkuhl, Katrin; Thorn, Caroline F.; Schwab, Matthias; Agúndez, José A G; Freimuth, Robert; Huser, Vojtech; Lee, Ming Ta Michael; Iwuchukwu, Otito F.; Crews, Kristine R.; Scott, Stuart A.; Wadelius, Mia; Swen, Jesse J.; Tyndale, Rachel F.; Stein, C. Michael; Roden, Dan; Relling, Mary V.; Williams, Marc S.; Johnson, Samuel G.

In: Current Drug Metabolism, Vol. 15, No. 2, 2014, p. 209-217.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Caudle, KE, Klein, TE, Hoffman, JM, Müller, DJ, Whirl-Carrillo, M, Gong, L, McDonagh, EM, Sangkuhl, K, Thorn, CF, Schwab, M, Agúndez, JAG, Freimuth, R, Huser, V, Lee, MTM, Iwuchukwu, OF, Crews, KR, Scott, SA, Wadelius, M, Swen, JJ, Tyndale, RF, Stein, CM, Roden, D, Relling, MV, Williams, MS & Johnson, SG 2014, 'Incorporation of pharmacogenomics into routine clinical practice: The clinical pharmacogenetics implementation consortium (CPIC) guideline development process', Current Drug Metabolism, vol. 15, no. 2, pp. 209-217. https://doi.org/10.2174/1389200215666140130124910
Caudle, Kelly E. ; Klein, Teri E. ; Hoffman, James M. ; Müller, Daniel J. ; Whirl-Carrillo, Michelle ; Gong, Li ; McDonagh, Ellen M. ; Sangkuhl, Katrin ; Thorn, Caroline F. ; Schwab, Matthias ; Agúndez, José A G ; Freimuth, Robert ; Huser, Vojtech ; Lee, Ming Ta Michael ; Iwuchukwu, Otito F. ; Crews, Kristine R. ; Scott, Stuart A. ; Wadelius, Mia ; Swen, Jesse J. ; Tyndale, Rachel F. ; Stein, C. Michael ; Roden, Dan ; Relling, Mary V. ; Williams, Marc S. ; Johnson, Samuel G. / Incorporation of pharmacogenomics into routine clinical practice : The clinical pharmacogenetics implementation consortium (CPIC) guideline development process. In: Current Drug Metabolism. 2014 ; Vol. 15, No. 2. pp. 209-217.
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