Impaired peripheral vasomotion in diabetes

Kevin B. Stansberry, Shane A Shapiro, Michael A. Hill, Patricia M. Mcnirr, Martin D. Meyer, Aaron I. Vinik

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

106 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE - To test the hypothesis that vasomotion, the rhythmic contraction exhibited by small arteries and arterioles, is impaired in diabetic subjects compared with healthy control subjects. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - We mathematically modeled the oscillations in laser Doppler microvascular measurements taken from the pulpar surface of the index finger in 20 healthy control subjects and 20 age-matched diabetic subjects (8 with type I and 12 with type II diabetes). The mean duration of diabetes was 17.1 ± 2.3 years, and mean HbA1, was9.1 ± 0.4%. Blood flow was measured for 5 min as subjects rested quietly in a closed room. Fast Fourier transformation was performed to provide the frequency power spectrum of each recording. Amplitude of vasomotion was correlated with six quantitative measurements of neuropathy. RESULTS - Diabetic subjects had impaired low-frequency oscillation vasomotion in 75% of age-matched patients (15 of 20 patients), with mean amplitudes of 24.9 ± 6.4 vs. 129.0 ± 33.2 (P < 0.0039). Of six somatic and autonomic neuropathy only the warm thermal sensory threshold correlated significantly with the mean amplitude of vasomotion (r = -0.75, P < 0.0009). CONCLUSIONS - Patterns of peripheral vasomotion are clearly disordered in diabetes. The loss of low-frequency oscillations observed here suggestes a peripheral vascular abnormality that extends past the capillary network to arterial vessels. It is uncertain whether the accompanying small unmyelinated nerve C-fiber dysfunction is a cause or consequence of the impaired microvascular function. Measurement of vasomotion may prove useful as a novel test for peripheral neurovascular function.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)715-721
Number of pages7
JournalDiabetes Care
Volume19
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1996
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Unmyelinated Nerve Fibers
Healthy Volunteers
Sensory Thresholds
Glycosylated Hemoglobin A
Arterioles
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Fingers
Blood Vessels
Lasers
Research Design
Arteries
Hot Temperature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing

Cite this

Stansberry, K. B., Shapiro, S. A., Hill, M. A., Mcnirr, P. M., Meyer, M. D., & Vinik, A. I. (1996). Impaired peripheral vasomotion in diabetes. Diabetes Care, 19(7), 715-721. https://doi.org/10.2337/diacare.19.7.715

Impaired peripheral vasomotion in diabetes. / Stansberry, Kevin B.; Shapiro, Shane A; Hill, Michael A.; Mcnirr, Patricia M.; Meyer, Martin D.; Vinik, Aaron I.

In: Diabetes Care, Vol. 19, No. 7, 01.01.1996, p. 715-721.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Stansberry, KB, Shapiro, SA, Hill, MA, Mcnirr, PM, Meyer, MD & Vinik, AI 1996, 'Impaired peripheral vasomotion in diabetes', Diabetes Care, vol. 19, no. 7, pp. 715-721. https://doi.org/10.2337/diacare.19.7.715
Stansberry KB, Shapiro SA, Hill MA, Mcnirr PM, Meyer MD, Vinik AI. Impaired peripheral vasomotion in diabetes. Diabetes Care. 1996 Jan 1;19(7):715-721. https://doi.org/10.2337/diacare.19.7.715
Stansberry, Kevin B. ; Shapiro, Shane A ; Hill, Michael A. ; Mcnirr, Patricia M. ; Meyer, Martin D. ; Vinik, Aaron I. / Impaired peripheral vasomotion in diabetes. In: Diabetes Care. 1996 ; Vol. 19, No. 7. pp. 715-721.
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