Hyperglycemia and hemorrhagic transformation of cerebral infarcts

J. P. Broderick, T. Hagen, Thomas G Brott, T. Tomsick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

76 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Identification of factors that predispose to bleeding into ischemic brain could lead to safer use of thrombolytic agents in tile setting of ischemic stroke. Recently de Courten-Meyers and colleagues reported that occluding the middle cerebral artery of markedly hyperglycemic cats was associated with 5-fold more frequent and 25-fold more extensive hemorrhage into infarcts than in normoglycemic animals. Hemorrhage associated with hyperglycemia in cats was much more pronounced with reperfusion than with permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion. Case Descriptions. We describe two patients with a unique presentation of diffuse hemorrhagic infarction of the caudate and lentiform nuclei associated with initially marked hyperglycemia and the subsequent development of hemichorea. Conclusions. We hypothesize that the marked hyperglycemia due to poor control of diabetes contributed to the hemorrhagic change of the caudate and lenticular nuclei. Because the hemorrhage in hyperglycemic cats was more pronounced in the setting of reperfusion, hemorrhagic risk associated with hyperglycemia should be investigated, particularly in ongoing thrombolytic treatment trials for acute ischemic stroke. We encourage other acute stroke investigators to prospectively look at the risk of brain hemorrhage in stroke patients with marked hyperglycemia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)484-487
Number of pages4
JournalStroke
Volume26
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Hyperglycemia
Stroke
Hemorrhage
Corpus Striatum
Cats
Caudate Nucleus
Reperfusion
Fibrinolytic Agents
Intracranial Hemorrhages
Middle Cerebral Artery Infarction
Middle Cerebral Artery
Infarction
Research Personnel
Brain
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • cerebral hemorrhage
  • cerebral infarction
  • diabetes mellitus
  • hyperglycemia
  • reperfusion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Broderick, J. P., Hagen, T., Brott, T. G., & Tomsick, T. (1995). Hyperglycemia and hemorrhagic transformation of cerebral infarcts. Stroke, 26(3), 484-487.

Hyperglycemia and hemorrhagic transformation of cerebral infarcts. / Broderick, J. P.; Hagen, T.; Brott, Thomas G; Tomsick, T.

In: Stroke, Vol. 26, No. 3, 1995, p. 484-487.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Broderick, JP, Hagen, T, Brott, TG & Tomsick, T 1995, 'Hyperglycemia and hemorrhagic transformation of cerebral infarcts', Stroke, vol. 26, no. 3, pp. 484-487.
Broderick JP, Hagen T, Brott TG, Tomsick T. Hyperglycemia and hemorrhagic transformation of cerebral infarcts. Stroke. 1995;26(3):484-487.
Broderick, J. P. ; Hagen, T. ; Brott, Thomas G ; Tomsick, T. / Hyperglycemia and hemorrhagic transformation of cerebral infarcts. In: Stroke. 1995 ; Vol. 26, No. 3. pp. 484-487.
@article{a3eff71372d24e23a340bd5d991bc943,
title = "Hyperglycemia and hemorrhagic transformation of cerebral infarcts",
abstract = "Background. Identification of factors that predispose to bleeding into ischemic brain could lead to safer use of thrombolytic agents in tile setting of ischemic stroke. Recently de Courten-Meyers and colleagues reported that occluding the middle cerebral artery of markedly hyperglycemic cats was associated with 5-fold more frequent and 25-fold more extensive hemorrhage into infarcts than in normoglycemic animals. Hemorrhage associated with hyperglycemia in cats was much more pronounced with reperfusion than with permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion. Case Descriptions. We describe two patients with a unique presentation of diffuse hemorrhagic infarction of the caudate and lentiform nuclei associated with initially marked hyperglycemia and the subsequent development of hemichorea. Conclusions. We hypothesize that the marked hyperglycemia due to poor control of diabetes contributed to the hemorrhagic change of the caudate and lenticular nuclei. Because the hemorrhage in hyperglycemic cats was more pronounced in the setting of reperfusion, hemorrhagic risk associated with hyperglycemia should be investigated, particularly in ongoing thrombolytic treatment trials for acute ischemic stroke. We encourage other acute stroke investigators to prospectively look at the risk of brain hemorrhage in stroke patients with marked hyperglycemia.",
keywords = "cerebral hemorrhage, cerebral infarction, diabetes mellitus, hyperglycemia, reperfusion",
author = "Broderick, {J. P.} and T. Hagen and Brott, {Thomas G} and T. Tomsick",
year = "1995",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "26",
pages = "484--487",
journal = "Stroke",
issn = "0039-2499",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Hyperglycemia and hemorrhagic transformation of cerebral infarcts

AU - Broderick, J. P.

AU - Hagen, T.

AU - Brott, Thomas G

AU - Tomsick, T.

PY - 1995

Y1 - 1995

N2 - Background. Identification of factors that predispose to bleeding into ischemic brain could lead to safer use of thrombolytic agents in tile setting of ischemic stroke. Recently de Courten-Meyers and colleagues reported that occluding the middle cerebral artery of markedly hyperglycemic cats was associated with 5-fold more frequent and 25-fold more extensive hemorrhage into infarcts than in normoglycemic animals. Hemorrhage associated with hyperglycemia in cats was much more pronounced with reperfusion than with permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion. Case Descriptions. We describe two patients with a unique presentation of diffuse hemorrhagic infarction of the caudate and lentiform nuclei associated with initially marked hyperglycemia and the subsequent development of hemichorea. Conclusions. We hypothesize that the marked hyperglycemia due to poor control of diabetes contributed to the hemorrhagic change of the caudate and lenticular nuclei. Because the hemorrhage in hyperglycemic cats was more pronounced in the setting of reperfusion, hemorrhagic risk associated with hyperglycemia should be investigated, particularly in ongoing thrombolytic treatment trials for acute ischemic stroke. We encourage other acute stroke investigators to prospectively look at the risk of brain hemorrhage in stroke patients with marked hyperglycemia.

AB - Background. Identification of factors that predispose to bleeding into ischemic brain could lead to safer use of thrombolytic agents in tile setting of ischemic stroke. Recently de Courten-Meyers and colleagues reported that occluding the middle cerebral artery of markedly hyperglycemic cats was associated with 5-fold more frequent and 25-fold more extensive hemorrhage into infarcts than in normoglycemic animals. Hemorrhage associated with hyperglycemia in cats was much more pronounced with reperfusion than with permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion. Case Descriptions. We describe two patients with a unique presentation of diffuse hemorrhagic infarction of the caudate and lentiform nuclei associated with initially marked hyperglycemia and the subsequent development of hemichorea. Conclusions. We hypothesize that the marked hyperglycemia due to poor control of diabetes contributed to the hemorrhagic change of the caudate and lenticular nuclei. Because the hemorrhage in hyperglycemic cats was more pronounced in the setting of reperfusion, hemorrhagic risk associated with hyperglycemia should be investigated, particularly in ongoing thrombolytic treatment trials for acute ischemic stroke. We encourage other acute stroke investigators to prospectively look at the risk of brain hemorrhage in stroke patients with marked hyperglycemia.

KW - cerebral hemorrhage

KW - cerebral infarction

KW - diabetes mellitus

KW - hyperglycemia

KW - reperfusion

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0028957247&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0028957247&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 7886729

AN - SCOPUS:0028957247

VL - 26

SP - 484

EP - 487

JO - Stroke

JF - Stroke

SN - 0039-2499

IS - 3

ER -