Human herpesvirus-6 infections in kidney, liver, lung, and heart transplantation: Review

Irmeli Lautenschlager, Raymund R Razonable

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

55 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6), which comprises of HHV-6A and HHV-6B, is a common infection after solid organ transplantation. The rate of HHV-6 reactivation is high, although clinical disease is not common. Only 1% of transplant recipients will develop clinical illness associated with HHV-6 infection, and most are ascribable to HHV-6B. Fever, myelosuppression, and end-organ disease, including hepatitis and encephalitis, have been reported. HHV-6 has also been associated with various indirect effects, including a higher rate of CMV disease, acute and chronic graft rejection, and opportunistic infection such as invasive fungal disease. All-cause mortality is increased in solid organ transplant recipients with HHV-6 infection. HHV-6 is somewhat unique among human viruses because of its ability to integrate into the host chromosome. The clinical significance of chromosomally integrated HHV-6 is not yet defined, although a higher rate of bacterial infection and allograft rejection has been suggested. The diagnosis of HHV-6 is now commonly made using nucleic acid testing for HHV-6 DNA in clinical samples, but this can be difficult to interpret owing to the common nature of asymptomatic viral reactivation. Treatment of HHV-6 is indicated in established end-organ disease such as encephalitis. Foscarnet, ganciclovir, and cidofovir have been used for treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)493-502
Number of pages10
JournalTransplant International
Volume25
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2012

Fingerprint

Human Herpesvirus 6
Herpesviridae Infections
Lung Transplantation
Liver Transplantation
Kidney Transplantation
Encephalitis
Foscarnet
Ganciclovir
Mycoses
Opportunistic Infections
Graft Rejection
Organ Transplantation
Acute Disease
Bacterial Infections
Nucleic Acids
Hepatitis
Allografts

Keywords

  • heart
  • HHV-6
  • kidney
  • liver
  • lung
  • transplantation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Transplantation

Cite this

Human herpesvirus-6 infections in kidney, liver, lung, and heart transplantation : Review. / Lautenschlager, Irmeli; Razonable, Raymund R.

In: Transplant International, Vol. 25, No. 5, 05.2012, p. 493-502.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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