Human fetal pancreatic islet-like structures as source material to treat type 1 diabetes

Yasuhiro H Ikeda, Yogish C Kudva

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The incidence of type 1 diabetes is increasing worldwide. Current therapy continues to be suboptimal. An exciting therapeutic advance in the short term is closed loop technology development and application. However, cell and tissue therapy continues to be an unmet need for the disorder. Human islets isolated from deceased donors will be clinically available to treat type 1 diabetes within the next 1 to 2 years. Other approaches such as xenotransplantation and islet products derived from human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells are currently being pursued. The current commentary provides context and discusses future endeavors for transplantation of islet-like structures derived from fetal pancreas.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number159
JournalStem Cell Research and Therapy
Volume4
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 30 2013

Fingerprint

Medical problems
Cell- and Tissue-Based Therapy
Stem cells
Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Islets of Langerhans
Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells
Islets of Langerhans Transplantation
Heterologous Transplantation
Pancreas
Fetus
Tissue
Incidence
Therapeutics
Industrial Development
Human Embryonic Stem Cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology (miscellaneous)
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Cell Biology
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Human fetal pancreatic islet-like structures as source material to treat type 1 diabetes. / Ikeda, Yasuhiro H; Kudva, Yogish C.

In: Stem Cell Research and Therapy, Vol. 4, No. 6, 159, 30.12.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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