Higher Body Mass Index Is Not Associated With Worse Pain Outcomes After Primary or Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty

Jasvinder A. Singh, Sherine E. Gabriel, David G. Lewallen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

64 Scopus citations

Abstract

We assessed whether higher body mass index (BMI) is associated with higher risk of moderate-severe knee pain 2 and 5 years after primary or revision total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We adjusted for sex, age, comorbidity, operative diagnosis, and implant fixation in multivariable logistic regression. Body mass index (reference, <25 kg/m2) was not associated with moderate-severe knee pain at 2 years postprimary TKA (odds ratio [95% confidence interval], 25-29.9, 1.02 [0.75-1.39], P = .90; 30-34.9, 0.93 [0.65-1.34], P = .71; 35-39.9, 1.16 [0.77-1.74], P = .47; ≥40, 1.09 [0.69-1.73], [all P values ≥ .47]). Similarly, BMI was not associated with moderate-severe pain at 5-year primary TKA and at 2-year and 5-year revision TKA follow-up. Lack of association of higher BMI with poor pain outcomes post-TKA implies that TKA should not be denied to obese patients for fear of suboptimal outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)366-374.e1
JournalJournal of Arthroplasty
Volume26
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2011

Keywords

  • Age
  • Body mass index
  • Comorbidity
  • Pain
  • Predictors
  • Sex
  • TKA
  • Total knee arthroplasty

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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