Herpes simplex virus infections and Alzheimer's disease: Implications for drug treatment and immunotherapy

Malcolm A. Leissring, Michael C. Sugarman, Frank M. LaFerla

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Interest in the possible role of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1) as a cofactor in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has re-emerged following the detection of viral DNA sequences in the central nervous system (CNS). Evidence from 2 independent laboratories indicates that HSV1 may interact with a host-specific factor, the apolipoprotein Eε4 allele, to further augment the risk for AD. In this review, we consider the arguments implicating HSV1 in the pathogenesis of AD. Although further studies are required to confirm a role for HSV1 in AD and to elucidate its underlying molecular basis, implicating a virus in the pathogenesis of this insidious disease clearly offers novel potential treatments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)193-198
Number of pages6
JournalDrugs and Aging
Volume13
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 20 1998

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Pharmacology (medical)

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