Health Information Seeking and Cancer Screening Adherence Rates

Yuliya Shneyderman, Lila J Rutten, Kristopher L. Arheart, Margaret M. Byrne, Julie Kornfeld, Seth J. Schwartz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Effective screening tools are available for many of the top cancer killers in the USA. Searching for health information has previously been found to be associated with adhering to cancer screening guidelines, but Internet information seeking has not been examined separately. The current study examines the relationship between health and cancer Internet information seeking and adherence to cancer screening guidelines for breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer in a large nationally representative dataset. The current study was conducted using data from the Health Information National Trends Survey from 2003 and 2007. The study examined age-stratified models which correlated health and cancer information seeking with getting breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer screening on schedule, while controlling for several key variables. Internet health and cancer information seeking was positively associated with getting Pap screening on schedule, while information seeking from any sources was positively associated with getting colorectal screening on schedule. People who look for health or cancer information are more likely to get screened on schedule. Some groups of people, however, do not exhibit this relationship and, thus, may be more vulnerable to under-screening. These groups may benefit more from targeted interventions that attempt to engage people in their health care more actively.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)75-83
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Cancer Education
Volume31
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016

Keywords

  • Breast cancer
  • Cancer screening
  • Cervical cancer
  • Colorectal cancer
  • Health information
  • HINTS
  • Internet health information

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Oncology

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  • Cite this

    Shneyderman, Y., Rutten, L. J., Arheart, K. L., Byrne, M. M., Kornfeld, J., & Schwartz, S. J. (2016). Health Information Seeking and Cancer Screening Adherence Rates. Journal of Cancer Education, 31(1), 75-83. https://doi.org/10.1007/s13187-015-0791-6