Harvey cushing and "birth hemorrhage": Early pediatric neurosurgery at the Johns Hopkins Hospital - Historical vignette

Vivek A. Mehta, Olindi Wijesekera, Courtney Pendleton, Alfredo Quiñones-Hinojosa, George I. Jallo, Edward S. Ahn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Of Harvey Cushing's many contributions to neurosurgery, one of the least documented is his early surgical intervention in children and his pioneering efforts to establish pediatric neurosurgery as a subspecialty. Between 1896 and 1912 Cushing conducted nearly 200 operations in children at The Johns Hopkins Hospital. A review of his records suggests that the advances he made in neurosurgery were significantly influenced by his experience with children. In this historical article, the authors describe Cushing's treatment of 6 children, in all of whom Cushing established a diagnosis of "birth hemorrhage." By reviewing Cushing's operative indications, techniques, and outcomes, the authors aim to understand the philosophy of his pediatric neurosurgical management and how this informed his development of neurosurgery as a new specialty.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)647-653
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Neurosurgery: Pediatrics
Volume8
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2011

Keywords

  • Birth hemorrhage
  • Harvey cushing
  • History

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Clinical Neurology

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