Giant cell (temporal) arteritis

Richard John Caselli, G. G. Hunder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Headache is the most frequent symptom for which a patient with giant cell arteritis (GCA) presents to a neurologist. Amaurosis fugax and ischemic optic neuropathy are well recognized complications. Less commonly recognized neurologic complications include transient ischemic attacks, cerebral infarctions, acute confusional states, multi-infarct dementia, ischemic cervical myelopathy, and ischemic mononeuropathies. Because patients with GCA generally respond well to corticosteroid therapy, prompt diagnosis can minimize neurologic damage.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)893-902
Number of pages10
JournalNeurologic Clinics
Volume15
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1997

Fingerprint

Giant Cell Arteritis
Nervous System
Amaurosis Fugax
Multi-Infarct Dementia
Spinal Cord Ischemia
Mononeuropathies
Ischemic Optic Neuropathy
Confusion
Transient Ischemic Attack
Cerebral Infarction
Headache
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Therapeutics
Neurologists

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Giant cell (temporal) arteritis. / Caselli, Richard John; Hunder, G. G.

In: Neurologic Clinics, Vol. 15, No. 4, 1997, p. 893-902.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Caselli, Richard John ; Hunder, G. G. / Giant cell (temporal) arteritis. In: Neurologic Clinics. 1997 ; Vol. 15, No. 4. pp. 893-902.
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