Genetically predicted circulating c-reactive protein concentration and colorectal cancer survival: A mendelian randomization consortium study

Xinwei Hua, James Y. Dai, Sara Lindstrom, Tabitha A. Harrison, Yi Lin, Steven R. Alberts, Elizabeth Alwers, Sonja I. Berndt, Hermann Brenner, Daniel D. Buchanan, Peter T. Campbell, Graham Casey, Jenny Chang-Claude, Steven Gallinger, Graham G. Giles, Richard M. Goldberg, Marc J. Gunter, Michael Hoffmeister, Mark A. Jenkins, Amit D. JoshiWenjie Ma, Roger L. Milne, Neil Murphy, Rish K. Pai, Lori C. Sakoda, Robert E. Schoen, Qian Shi, Martha L. Slattery, Mingyang Song, Emily White, Loic Le Marchand, Andrew T. Chan, Ulrike Peters, Polly A. Newcomb

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: A positive association between circulating Creactive protein (CRP) and colorectal cancer survival was reported in observational studies, which are susceptible to unmeasured confounding and reverse causality.Weused a Mendelian randomization approach to evaluate the association between genetically predicted CRP concentrations and colorectal cancer-specific survival. Methods: We used individual-level data for 16,918 eligible colorectal cancer cases of European ancestry from 15 studies within the International Survival Analysis of Colorectal Cancer Consortium. Wecalculated a genetic-risk score based on 52 CRP-associated genetic variants identified from genome-wide association studies. Because of the non-collapsibility of hazard ratios from Cox proportional hazards models, we used the additive hazards model to calculate hazard differences (HD) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between genetically predicted CRP concentrations and colorectal cancer-specific survival, overall and by stage at diagnosis and tumor location. Analyses were adjusted for age at diagnosis, sex, body mass index, genotyping platform, study, and principal components. Results: Of the 5,395 (32%) deaths accrued over up to 10 years of follow-up, 3,808 (23%) were due to colorectal cancer. Genetically predicted CRP concentration was not associated with colorectal cancer-specific survival (HD, 1.15; 95% CI, 2.76 to 0.47 per 100,000 person-years; P = 0.16). Similarly, no associations were observed in subgroup analyses by stage at diagnosis or tumor location. Conclusions: Despite adequate power to detect moderate associations, our results did not support a causal effect of circulating CRP concentrations on colorectal cancer-specific survival.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Oncology

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