Gene delivery to bone

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

74 Scopus citations

Abstract

Gene delivery to bone is useful both as an experimental tool and as a potential therapeutic strategy. Among its advantages over protein delivery are the potential for directed, sustained and regulated expression of authentically processed, nascent proteins. Although no clinical trials have been initiated, there is a substantial pre-clinical literature documenting the successful transfer of genes to bone, and their intraosseous expression. Recombinant vectors derived from adenovirus, retrovirus and lentivirus, as well as non-viral vectors, have been used for this purpose. Both ex vivo and in vivo strategies, including gene-activated matrices, have been explored. Ex vivo delivery has often employed mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), partly because of their ability to differentiate into osteoblasts. MSCs also have the potential to home to bone after systemic administration, which could serve as a useful way to deliver transgenes in a disseminated fashion for the treatment of diseases affecting the whole skeleton, such as osteoporosis or osteogenesis imperfecta. Local delivery of osteogenic transgenes, particularly those encoding bone morphogenetic proteins, has shown great promise in a number of applications where it is necessary to regenerate bone. These include healing large segmental defects in long bones and the cranium, as well as spinal fusion and treating avascular necrosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1331-1340
Number of pages10
JournalAdvanced Drug Delivery Reviews
Volume64
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2012

    Fingerprint

Keywords

  • Animal models
  • Bone healing
  • Facilitated endogenous repair
  • Gene therapy
  • Osteogenesis imperfecta
  • Research translation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmaceutical Science

Cite this