Gender differences in self-reported use, perceived efficacy, and interest in future use of nicotine-dependence treatments: A cross-sectional survey in adults at a tertiary care center for nicotine dependence

Sujata Narayanan, Jon Owen Ebbert, Amit Sood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Clinical trials have assessed the effectiveness of nicotine-dependence treatments (NDTs), alone or in combination, and reported that men and women have variable responses to these treatments. The variations in therapeutic responses highlight the need to explore gender-specific preferences for NDTs, including complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), which has become increasingly popular in the US population for the cessation of tobacco use. Objective: The aim of this study was to assess gender differences in the self-reported use, perceived efficacy, and interest in future use of NDTs, including CAM, in an outpatient setting. Methods: This cross-sectional survey was conducted in men and women at a tertiary care NDT clinic. The primary inclusion criterion was the willingness and ability of the patients to participate in the survey. Results: Data from 1171 patients were included (599 men, 572 women; mean age: men, 46.2 years; women, 46.5 years). Of these, 68% of women and 65% of men reported use of nicotine-replacement therapy (NRT), other prescription medication, or counseling/group support. In men and women, NRT was the most commonly used type of pharmacologic treatment, of which the patch was the most popular (77% and 75%). A significantly greater proportion of women than men perceived the nicotine inhaler to be efficacious (67% vs 50%; P = 0.027). No other significant gender differences were found among NRTs. Among non-NRT methods, bupropion sustained release (SR) and counseling/group support were used by significantly more women than men (53% vs 43% [P = 0.007] and 16% vs 11% [P = 0.026], respectively). Compared with men, significantly greater proportions of women reported current or previous use of CAM for nicotine abstinence and expressed an interest in future use of CAM (34% vs 22% [P < 0.001] and 71% vs 64% [P = 0.006]). Conclusions: In this sample of patients at an NDT clinic, significantly more women than men reported previous use of bupropion SR, counseling, and CAM. More women than men expressed an interest in the future use of CAM. Based on these findings, an improved understanding of gender-based differences in the use of conventional and nonconventional NDTs might improve the rates of success of nicotine-cessation efforts among women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)362-368
Number of pages7
JournalGender Medicine
Volume6
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2009

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Tobacco Use Disorder
Complementary Therapies
Tertiary Care Centers
nicotine
gender-specific factors
Cross-Sectional Studies
alternative medicine
Nicotine
Therapeutics
group counseling
Bupropion
Counseling
medication
Tobacco Use Cessation
proportion of women
Aptitude
Nebulizers and Vaporizers
gender
Tertiary Healthcare
Prescriptions

Keywords

  • complementary and alternative medicine
  • gender
  • nicotine-dependence treatments

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Gender Studies

Cite this

@article{f1a056f3017f4c30836b585ca45e86d1,
title = "Gender differences in self-reported use, perceived efficacy, and interest in future use of nicotine-dependence treatments: A cross-sectional survey in adults at a tertiary care center for nicotine dependence",
abstract = "Background: Clinical trials have assessed the effectiveness of nicotine-dependence treatments (NDTs), alone or in combination, and reported that men and women have variable responses to these treatments. The variations in therapeutic responses highlight the need to explore gender-specific preferences for NDTs, including complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), which has become increasingly popular in the US population for the cessation of tobacco use. Objective: The aim of this study was to assess gender differences in the self-reported use, perceived efficacy, and interest in future use of NDTs, including CAM, in an outpatient setting. Methods: This cross-sectional survey was conducted in men and women at a tertiary care NDT clinic. The primary inclusion criterion was the willingness and ability of the patients to participate in the survey. Results: Data from 1171 patients were included (599 men, 572 women; mean age: men, 46.2 years; women, 46.5 years). Of these, 68{\%} of women and 65{\%} of men reported use of nicotine-replacement therapy (NRT), other prescription medication, or counseling/group support. In men and women, NRT was the most commonly used type of pharmacologic treatment, of which the patch was the most popular (77{\%} and 75{\%}). A significantly greater proportion of women than men perceived the nicotine inhaler to be efficacious (67{\%} vs 50{\%}; P = 0.027). No other significant gender differences were found among NRTs. Among non-NRT methods, bupropion sustained release (SR) and counseling/group support were used by significantly more women than men (53{\%} vs 43{\%} [P = 0.007] and 16{\%} vs 11{\%} [P = 0.026], respectively). Compared with men, significantly greater proportions of women reported current or previous use of CAM for nicotine abstinence and expressed an interest in future use of CAM (34{\%} vs 22{\%} [P < 0.001] and 71{\%} vs 64{\%} [P = 0.006]). Conclusions: In this sample of patients at an NDT clinic, significantly more women than men reported previous use of bupropion SR, counseling, and CAM. More women than men expressed an interest in the future use of CAM. Based on these findings, an improved understanding of gender-based differences in the use of conventional and nonconventional NDTs might improve the rates of success of nicotine-cessation efforts among women.",
keywords = "complementary and alternative medicine, gender, nicotine-dependence treatments",
author = "Sujata Narayanan and Ebbert, {Jon Owen} and Amit Sood",
year = "2009",
month = "7",
doi = "10.1016/j.genm.2009.06.002",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "6",
pages = "362--368",
journal = "Gender Medicine",
issn = "1550-8579",
publisher = "Excerpta Medica",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Gender differences in self-reported use, perceived efficacy, and interest in future use of nicotine-dependence treatments

T2 - A cross-sectional survey in adults at a tertiary care center for nicotine dependence

AU - Narayanan, Sujata

AU - Ebbert, Jon Owen

AU - Sood, Amit

PY - 2009/7

Y1 - 2009/7

N2 - Background: Clinical trials have assessed the effectiveness of nicotine-dependence treatments (NDTs), alone or in combination, and reported that men and women have variable responses to these treatments. The variations in therapeutic responses highlight the need to explore gender-specific preferences for NDTs, including complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), which has become increasingly popular in the US population for the cessation of tobacco use. Objective: The aim of this study was to assess gender differences in the self-reported use, perceived efficacy, and interest in future use of NDTs, including CAM, in an outpatient setting. Methods: This cross-sectional survey was conducted in men and women at a tertiary care NDT clinic. The primary inclusion criterion was the willingness and ability of the patients to participate in the survey. Results: Data from 1171 patients were included (599 men, 572 women; mean age: men, 46.2 years; women, 46.5 years). Of these, 68% of women and 65% of men reported use of nicotine-replacement therapy (NRT), other prescription medication, or counseling/group support. In men and women, NRT was the most commonly used type of pharmacologic treatment, of which the patch was the most popular (77% and 75%). A significantly greater proportion of women than men perceived the nicotine inhaler to be efficacious (67% vs 50%; P = 0.027). No other significant gender differences were found among NRTs. Among non-NRT methods, bupropion sustained release (SR) and counseling/group support were used by significantly more women than men (53% vs 43% [P = 0.007] and 16% vs 11% [P = 0.026], respectively). Compared with men, significantly greater proportions of women reported current or previous use of CAM for nicotine abstinence and expressed an interest in future use of CAM (34% vs 22% [P < 0.001] and 71% vs 64% [P = 0.006]). Conclusions: In this sample of patients at an NDT clinic, significantly more women than men reported previous use of bupropion SR, counseling, and CAM. More women than men expressed an interest in the future use of CAM. Based on these findings, an improved understanding of gender-based differences in the use of conventional and nonconventional NDTs might improve the rates of success of nicotine-cessation efforts among women.

AB - Background: Clinical trials have assessed the effectiveness of nicotine-dependence treatments (NDTs), alone or in combination, and reported that men and women have variable responses to these treatments. The variations in therapeutic responses highlight the need to explore gender-specific preferences for NDTs, including complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), which has become increasingly popular in the US population for the cessation of tobacco use. Objective: The aim of this study was to assess gender differences in the self-reported use, perceived efficacy, and interest in future use of NDTs, including CAM, in an outpatient setting. Methods: This cross-sectional survey was conducted in men and women at a tertiary care NDT clinic. The primary inclusion criterion was the willingness and ability of the patients to participate in the survey. Results: Data from 1171 patients were included (599 men, 572 women; mean age: men, 46.2 years; women, 46.5 years). Of these, 68% of women and 65% of men reported use of nicotine-replacement therapy (NRT), other prescription medication, or counseling/group support. In men and women, NRT was the most commonly used type of pharmacologic treatment, of which the patch was the most popular (77% and 75%). A significantly greater proportion of women than men perceived the nicotine inhaler to be efficacious (67% vs 50%; P = 0.027). No other significant gender differences were found among NRTs. Among non-NRT methods, bupropion sustained release (SR) and counseling/group support were used by significantly more women than men (53% vs 43% [P = 0.007] and 16% vs 11% [P = 0.026], respectively). Compared with men, significantly greater proportions of women reported current or previous use of CAM for nicotine abstinence and expressed an interest in future use of CAM (34% vs 22% [P < 0.001] and 71% vs 64% [P = 0.006]). Conclusions: In this sample of patients at an NDT clinic, significantly more women than men reported previous use of bupropion SR, counseling, and CAM. More women than men expressed an interest in the future use of CAM. Based on these findings, an improved understanding of gender-based differences in the use of conventional and nonconventional NDTs might improve the rates of success of nicotine-cessation efforts among women.

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