From the Archives of the AFIP: The Many Faces of Osteosarcoma

Mark D. Murphey, Mark R. Robbin, Gina A. McRae, Donald J. Flemming, H. Thomas Temple, Mark J. Kransdorf

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

141 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Osteosarcoma is the most common primary malignant tumor of bone in adolescents and young adults. It accounts for approximately 15% of all primary bone tumors confirmed at biopsy. There are numerous types of primary osteosarcoma, including intramedullary (high grade, telangiectatic, low grade, small cell, osteosarcomatosis, and gnathic), surface (intracortical, parosteal, periosteal, and high-grade surface), and extraskeletal. Osteosarcoma may also occur as a secondary lesion in association with underlying benign conditions. The identification of osteoid matrix formation and aggressive characteristics usually allows prospective radiologic diagnosis of osteosarcoma. As with all bone tumors, differential diagnosis is best assessed with radiographs, whereas staging is performed with computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Understanding and recognition of the variable appearances of the different varieties of osteosarcoma allow improved patient assessment and are vital for optimal clinical management including diagnosis, biopsy, staging, treatment, and follow-up.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1205-1231
Number of pages27
JournalRadiographics
Volume17
Issue number5
StatePublished - Sep 1997
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Osteosarcoma
Bone and Bones
Biopsy
Neoplasms
Young Adult
Differential Diagnosis
Tomography
Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Keywords

  • Bone neoplasms, 40.3221, 40.375
  • Neoplasms, in infants and children, 40.3221, 40.375
  • Osteosarcoma, 40.3221, 40.375

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

Murphey, M. D., Robbin, M. R., McRae, G. A., Flemming, D. J., Temple, H. T., & Kransdorf, M. J. (1997). From the Archives of the AFIP: The Many Faces of Osteosarcoma. Radiographics, 17(5), 1205-1231.

From the Archives of the AFIP : The Many Faces of Osteosarcoma. / Murphey, Mark D.; Robbin, Mark R.; McRae, Gina A.; Flemming, Donald J.; Temple, H. Thomas; Kransdorf, Mark J.

In: Radiographics, Vol. 17, No. 5, 09.1997, p. 1205-1231.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Murphey, MD, Robbin, MR, McRae, GA, Flemming, DJ, Temple, HT & Kransdorf, MJ 1997, 'From the Archives of the AFIP: The Many Faces of Osteosarcoma', Radiographics, vol. 17, no. 5, pp. 1205-1231.
Murphey MD, Robbin MR, McRae GA, Flemming DJ, Temple HT, Kransdorf MJ. From the Archives of the AFIP: The Many Faces of Osteosarcoma. Radiographics. 1997 Sep;17(5):1205-1231.
Murphey, Mark D. ; Robbin, Mark R. ; McRae, Gina A. ; Flemming, Donald J. ; Temple, H. Thomas ; Kransdorf, Mark J. / From the Archives of the AFIP : The Many Faces of Osteosarcoma. In: Radiographics. 1997 ; Vol. 17, No. 5. pp. 1205-1231.
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