Following the rotational trajectory of the principal hydrodynamic frame of a protein using multiple probes

Thomas P Burghardt, Katalin Ajtai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A generalized set of fluorescence polarization intensities and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra from multiple fluorescent and EPR probes of a specific site on an oriented and immobilized protein element in a biological assembly, combined with anisotropic rotational relaxation studies of the purified and labeled protein element freely rotationally diffusing in solution, are used to determine the angular distribution of the principal hydrodynamic frame of the protein element in the biological assembly. This multiprobe analysis method removes all of the basic ambiguities in the measured principal frame angular distribution introduced by limitations or symmetries intrinsic to standard fluorescence polarization intensity ratios and EPR spectra. The angular distribution of the principal frame is also more highly resolved than that previously reported for multiprobe determinations of probe angular distributions and is more useful for determining biological mechanisms because it indicates the order and orientation of the protein element rather than that of the extrinsic probe. Application of this method to the determination of the principal hydrodynamic frame distribution of myosin cross-bridges in muscle fibers in four physiological states, including the active isometric state, demonstrates the method's practicality by indicating the path of cross-bridge orientation changes during the active cycle [Ajtai, Toft, & Burghardt (1994) Biochemistry (following paper in this issue)].

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5376-5381
Number of pages6
JournalBiochemistry
Volume33
Issue number18
StatePublished - 1994

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Angular distribution
Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy
Hydrodynamics
Fluorescence Polarization
Trajectories
Paramagnetic resonance
Immobilized Proteins
Proteins
Fluorescence
Polarization
Myosins
Biochemistry
Muscle
Muscles
Fibers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry

Cite this

Following the rotational trajectory of the principal hydrodynamic frame of a protein using multiple probes. / Burghardt, Thomas P; Ajtai, Katalin.

In: Biochemistry, Vol. 33, No. 18, 1994, p. 5376-5381.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Burghardt, Thomas P ; Ajtai, Katalin. / Following the rotational trajectory of the principal hydrodynamic frame of a protein using multiple probes. In: Biochemistry. 1994 ; Vol. 33, No. 18. pp. 5376-5381.
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