Experimental strategies to promote central nervous system remyelination in multiple sclerosis: Insights gained from the Theiler's virus model system

D. J. Miller, K. Asakura, M. Rodriguez

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

The Destruction of central nervous system (CNS) myelin, the lipid‐rich insulator surrounding axons in the mammalian brain and spinal cord, is the primary pathological finding in multiple sclerosis. Myelin loss can result in a significant clinical deficit, and was originally thought to be permanent, similar to axonal destruction. However, myelin regeneration is now an established phenomenon in both human disease and animal models of CNS demyelination. In this review, the concept of remyelination in demyelinating deseases such as multiple sclerosis is discussed and the usefulness of animal models of CNS demyelination in developing experimental strategies to promote remyelination is examined Special emphasis is given to the Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis model, which has been the primary animal model used to investigate therapies designed specifically to stimulate myelin repair. © 1995 Wiley‐Liss, Inc.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)291-296
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Neuroscience Research
Volume41
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 15 1995

Keywords

  • autoantibody
  • immunosuppression
  • myelin
  • oligodendrocyte

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

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