Evaluation of a tuberculosis education video among immigrants and refugees at an adult education center: A community-based participatory approach

Mark L. Wieland, Jonathan Nelson, Tiffany Palmer, Connie O'Hara, Jennifer A. Weis, Julie A. Nigon, Irene Gaw Sia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Tuberculosis disproportionately affects immigrants and refugees to the United States. Upon arrival to the United States, many of these individuals attend adult education centers, but little is known about how to deliver tuberculosis health information at these venues. Therefore, the authors used a participatory approach to design and evaluate a tuberculosis education video in this setting. The authors used focus group data to inform the content of the video that was produced and delivered by adult learners and their teachers. The video was evaluated by learners for acceptability through 3 items with a 3-point Likert scale. Knowledge (4 items) and self-efficacy (2 items) about tuberculosis were evaluated before and after viewing the video. A total of 159 learners (94%) rated the video as highly acceptable. Knowledge about tuberculosis improved after viewing the video (56% correct vs. 82% correct; p <.001), as did tuberculosis-related self-efficacy (77% vs. 90%; p <.001). Adult education centers that serve large immigrant and refugee populations may be excellent venues for health education, and a video may be an effective tool to educate these populations. Furthermore, a participatory approach in designing health education materials may enhance the efficacy of these tools.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)343-353
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Health Communication
Volume18
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2013

Fingerprint

education center
Refugees
Adult Education
contagious disease
refugee
Tuberculosis
video
Education
immigrant
evaluation
community
Health
education
Self Efficacy
Health Education
health promotion
self-efficacy
Focus Groups
Population
health information

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health(social science)
  • Library and Information Sciences
  • Communication

Cite this

Evaluation of a tuberculosis education video among immigrants and refugees at an adult education center : A community-based participatory approach. / Wieland, Mark L.; Nelson, Jonathan; Palmer, Tiffany; O'Hara, Connie; Weis, Jennifer A.; Nigon, Julie A.; Sia, Irene Gaw.

In: Journal of Health Communication, Vol. 18, No. 3, 01.03.2013, p. 343-353.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{19c478e565a54f7b8b8ee9cd099aed63,
title = "Evaluation of a tuberculosis education video among immigrants and refugees at an adult education center: A community-based participatory approach",
abstract = "Tuberculosis disproportionately affects immigrants and refugees to the United States. Upon arrival to the United States, many of these individuals attend adult education centers, but little is known about how to deliver tuberculosis health information at these venues. Therefore, the authors used a participatory approach to design and evaluate a tuberculosis education video in this setting. The authors used focus group data to inform the content of the video that was produced and delivered by adult learners and their teachers. The video was evaluated by learners for acceptability through 3 items with a 3-point Likert scale. Knowledge (4 items) and self-efficacy (2 items) about tuberculosis were evaluated before and after viewing the video. A total of 159 learners (94{\%}) rated the video as highly acceptable. Knowledge about tuberculosis improved after viewing the video (56{\%} correct vs. 82{\%} correct; p <.001), as did tuberculosis-related self-efficacy (77{\%} vs. 90{\%}; p <.001). Adult education centers that serve large immigrant and refugee populations may be excellent venues for health education, and a video may be an effective tool to educate these populations. Furthermore, a participatory approach in designing health education materials may enhance the efficacy of these tools.",
author = "Wieland, {Mark L.} and Jonathan Nelson and Tiffany Palmer and Connie O'Hara and Weis, {Jennifer A.} and Nigon, {Julie A.} and Sia, {Irene Gaw}",
year = "2013",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1080/10810730.2012.727952",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "18",
pages = "343--353",
journal = "Journal of Health Communication",
issn = "1081-0730",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis Ltd.",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Evaluation of a tuberculosis education video among immigrants and refugees at an adult education center

T2 - A community-based participatory approach

AU - Wieland, Mark L.

AU - Nelson, Jonathan

AU - Palmer, Tiffany

AU - O'Hara, Connie

AU - Weis, Jennifer A.

AU - Nigon, Julie A.

AU - Sia, Irene Gaw

PY - 2013/3/1

Y1 - 2013/3/1

N2 - Tuberculosis disproportionately affects immigrants and refugees to the United States. Upon arrival to the United States, many of these individuals attend adult education centers, but little is known about how to deliver tuberculosis health information at these venues. Therefore, the authors used a participatory approach to design and evaluate a tuberculosis education video in this setting. The authors used focus group data to inform the content of the video that was produced and delivered by adult learners and their teachers. The video was evaluated by learners for acceptability through 3 items with a 3-point Likert scale. Knowledge (4 items) and self-efficacy (2 items) about tuberculosis were evaluated before and after viewing the video. A total of 159 learners (94%) rated the video as highly acceptable. Knowledge about tuberculosis improved after viewing the video (56% correct vs. 82% correct; p <.001), as did tuberculosis-related self-efficacy (77% vs. 90%; p <.001). Adult education centers that serve large immigrant and refugee populations may be excellent venues for health education, and a video may be an effective tool to educate these populations. Furthermore, a participatory approach in designing health education materials may enhance the efficacy of these tools.

AB - Tuberculosis disproportionately affects immigrants and refugees to the United States. Upon arrival to the United States, many of these individuals attend adult education centers, but little is known about how to deliver tuberculosis health information at these venues. Therefore, the authors used a participatory approach to design and evaluate a tuberculosis education video in this setting. The authors used focus group data to inform the content of the video that was produced and delivered by adult learners and their teachers. The video was evaluated by learners for acceptability through 3 items with a 3-point Likert scale. Knowledge (4 items) and self-efficacy (2 items) about tuberculosis were evaluated before and after viewing the video. A total of 159 learners (94%) rated the video as highly acceptable. Knowledge about tuberculosis improved after viewing the video (56% correct vs. 82% correct; p <.001), as did tuberculosis-related self-efficacy (77% vs. 90%; p <.001). Adult education centers that serve large immigrant and refugee populations may be excellent venues for health education, and a video may be an effective tool to educate these populations. Furthermore, a participatory approach in designing health education materials may enhance the efficacy of these tools.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84874245237&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84874245237&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/10810730.2012.727952

DO - 10.1080/10810730.2012.727952

M3 - Article

C2 - 23237382

AN - SCOPUS:84874245237

VL - 18

SP - 343

EP - 353

JO - Journal of Health Communication

JF - Journal of Health Communication

SN - 1081-0730

IS - 3

ER -