Estrogen suppresses stromal cell-dependent lymphopoiesis in culture

G. Smithson, Kay L Medina, I. Ponting, P. W. Kincade

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Numbers of pre-B cells change dramatically and reciprocally in response to estrogen levels in mice, suggesting that normal lymphopoiesis may be under hormonal control. However, little is known of the mechanisms involved in this process. We found that estrogen receptor mRNA was detectable by RT-PCR in lymphocyte supporting stromal cells as well as B lymphocyte precursors. Unlike glucocorticoids, estrogen did not induce apoptosis in isolated B lineage lymphocytes or interfere with their responsiveness to IL-7 in semisolid agar. Estrogen did inhibit clonal expansion of B cell precursors in a limiting dilution-type assay when the lymphocytes were cultured on a stromal cell clone. In other experiments, B cell precursors at particular stages of differentiation were isolated by cell sorting and cocultured with stromal cells for 4 days. This revealed that some subsets were more sensitive to an estrogen-containing environment than others. Although numbers of recovered cells were greatly reduced, the remaining lymphocytes had undergone relatively normal differentiation. The surviving population was enriched in cells that had acquired cytoplasmic μ chains, BP-1 Ag, and clonability with IL-7. Hormone-mediated inhibition occurred in serum and phenol-red free medium, and in cultures replete with IL-7. Direct contact between stromal cells and lymphocytes was not required. Furthermore, suppression resulted when stromal cells alone were treated with the hormone. These findings indicate that estrogen may regulate B lymphopoiesis via its influence on the microenvironment and that estrogen-induced stromal cell genes merit further study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3409-3417
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Immunology
Volume155
Issue number7
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

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Lymphopoiesis
Stromal Cells
Estrogens
B-Lymphoid Precursor Cells
Interleukin-7
Lymphocytes
Hormones
Phenolsulfonphthalein
Estrogen Receptors
Glucocorticoids
Agar
Culture Media
Clone Cells
Cell Count
Apoptosis
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Messenger RNA
Serum
Population
Genes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

Smithson, G., Medina, K. L., Ponting, I., & Kincade, P. W. (1995). Estrogen suppresses stromal cell-dependent lymphopoiesis in culture. Journal of Immunology, 155(7), 3409-3417.

Estrogen suppresses stromal cell-dependent lymphopoiesis in culture. / Smithson, G.; Medina, Kay L; Ponting, I.; Kincade, P. W.

In: Journal of Immunology, Vol. 155, No. 7, 1995, p. 3409-3417.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Smithson, G, Medina, KL, Ponting, I & Kincade, PW 1995, 'Estrogen suppresses stromal cell-dependent lymphopoiesis in culture', Journal of Immunology, vol. 155, no. 7, pp. 3409-3417.
Smithson, G. ; Medina, Kay L ; Ponting, I. ; Kincade, P. W. / Estrogen suppresses stromal cell-dependent lymphopoiesis in culture. In: Journal of Immunology. 1995 ; Vol. 155, No. 7. pp. 3409-3417.
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