Epidemiologic features of pelvic fractures

L. J. Melton, J. M. Sampson, B. F. Morrey, D. M. Ilstrup

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

176 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The epidemiology of pelvic fractures was investigated in Rochester, Minnesota, residents during the decade 1968 to 1977. The overall incidence was 37 per 100,000 person-years, substantially higher than previous population-based studies would indicate. The incidence increased markedly with age in both sexes, and was greater for women than men at all ages over 35, reaching a maximum incidence of 446.3 per 100,000 person-years in women 85 or older. Half of all pelvic fractures were attributed to moderate trauma, usually a fall from standing height, 95% of which were minor (Type I or II). Moderate trauma was responsible for the increase in pelvic fracture incidence with age in the high-risk population of postmenopausal women. A large proportion of both men and women with moderate trauma fractures had some evidence of preexisting osteoporosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)43-47
Number of pages5
JournalClinical Orthopaedics and Related Research
VolumeNo. 155
StatePublished - 1981

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Incidence
Wounds and Injuries
Population
Osteoporosis
Epidemiology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Surgery

Cite this

Melton, L. J., Sampson, J. M., Morrey, B. F., & Ilstrup, D. M. (1981). Epidemiologic features of pelvic fractures. Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, No. 155, 43-47.

Epidemiologic features of pelvic fractures. / Melton, L. J.; Sampson, J. M.; Morrey, B. F.; Ilstrup, D. M.

In: Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, Vol. No. 155, 1981, p. 43-47.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Melton, LJ, Sampson, JM, Morrey, BF & Ilstrup, DM 1981, 'Epidemiologic features of pelvic fractures', Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, vol. No. 155, pp. 43-47.
Melton LJ, Sampson JM, Morrey BF, Ilstrup DM. Epidemiologic features of pelvic fractures. Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research. 1981;No. 155:43-47.
Melton, L. J. ; Sampson, J. M. ; Morrey, B. F. ; Ilstrup, D. M. / Epidemiologic features of pelvic fractures. In: Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research. 1981 ; Vol. No. 155. pp. 43-47.
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