Eosinophilic myeloid neoplasms

Pierre Noel, Ruben A. Mesa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose of Review: In 2012, idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) is still the prevalent diagnosis in patients with persistent eosinophilia, in which a primary or secondary cause of eosinophilia has not been identified. HES is considered a provisional diagnosis until a primary or secondary cause of hypereosinophilia is established. The discovery of imatinib-sensitive fusion proteins in a subset of patients with hypereosinophilia has changed the way we approach the diagnosis and treatment of eosinophilic myeloid neoplasms [eosinophilic myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs)]. Despite the recent diagnostic developments, diagnosis of hypereosinophilic MPN is only made in 10-20% of patients with persistent primary hypereosinophilia. Recent Findings: In 2008 the World Health Organization (WHO) established a semi-molecular classification of hypereosinophilic MPNs. The discovery of PDGFRA, PDGFRB, FGFR1, JAK-2, and FLT3 fusion proteins in patients with eosinophilic MPNs provide opportunities for targeted therapy. Patients with hypereosinophilic MPNs associated with PDGFRA and PDGFRB fusion genes are responsive to imatinib. Summary: Ongoing research continues to expand our understanding of the pathophysiology of persistent primary hypereosinophilia and clarify the boundaries between some of these disorders. A key challenge is to identify new targets for therapy and limit the number of patients who are classified as having HES.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)157-162
Number of pages6
JournalCurrent Opinion in Hematology
Volume20
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2013

Fingerprint

Hypereosinophilic Syndrome
Platelet-Derived Growth Factor beta Receptor
Neoplasms
Eosinophilia
Gene Fusion
Proteins
Therapeutics
Research
Imatinib Mesylate

Keywords

  • eosinophilia
  • hypereosinophilic syndrome
  • myeloproliferative neoplasms
  • PDGFRA
  • PDGFRB

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology

Cite this

Eosinophilic myeloid neoplasms. / Noel, Pierre; Mesa, Ruben A.

In: Current Opinion in Hematology, Vol. 20, No. 2, 03.2013, p. 157-162.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Noel, Pierre ; Mesa, Ruben A. / Eosinophilic myeloid neoplasms. In: Current Opinion in Hematology. 2013 ; Vol. 20, No. 2. pp. 157-162.
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